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Niteowl009
Niteowl009 • 1 year ago

Mary Smith Kelsey Peake (1823–1862) taught many former slaves underneath Emancipation Oak. Sept 1861, she started a school near Fort Monroe, within present grounds of Hampton Univ. Supported herself as a dressmaker, & secretly taught from her home, instructing African Americans of all ages. Founded the Daughters of Zion to provide aid to the poor & the sick. In 1851 she married Thomas Peake, a former slave. Today, the city of Hampton honors Peake with a school, a street, & a park.

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