Categories

Come on in! Join Pinterest today...it only takes like a second or so.

More like this: dressmaker, african americans and the city.
Visit Site
Niteowl009
Niteowl009 • 1 year ago

Mary Smith Kelsey Peake (1823–1862) taught many former slaves underneath Emancipation Oak. Sept 1861, she started a school near Fort Monroe, within present grounds of Hampton Univ. Supported herself as a dressmaker, & secretly taught from her home, instructing African Americans of all ages. Founded the Daughters of Zion to provide aid to the poor & the sick. In 1851 she married Thomas Peake, a former slave. Today, the city of Hampton honors Peake with a school, a street, & a park.

Also on these boards:

Related Pins:

Dr. Eliza Ann Grier. Born a slave she became the first African American to practice medicine in Georgia

Mozella This is an old photograph of a young African American girl posing in a photo booth sometime during the 1930's. Written above her in faded ink is "Mozella." There is nothing to indicate where this photograph was taken

Jacob Lawrence- Influential African American artist known for his "Migration" series

Rosie the Riveter, African American style

The 1968 Olympics Black Power Salute: African American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos raise their fists in a gesture of solidarity at the 1968 Olympic games. Australian Silver medalist Peter Norman wore an Olympic Project for Human Rights badge in support of their protest. Both Americans were expelled from the games as a result.

Hose Company No. 4 | 1919 African American fire fighters stationed at Hose Company No. 4, Los Angeles, CA

Elizabeth Keckley. Former slave turned businesswoman. Mary Lincoln's dressmaker and friend in the White House.

Thomas Mundy Peterson, first African American to vote, March 31, 1870.

Mary Edmonia Lewis (ca. July 4, 1845 – ca. 1911) was the first African American and Native American woman to gain fame and recognition as a sculptor in the international fine arts world. She was of African American, Haitian and Ojibwe descent.