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Capturing a city in a day. << The urban environment of the world’s towns and cities provides photographers easy access to the greatest variety of subject matter. In the time it takes to walk a block or two, you can photograph panoramic skylines; people up close, at work or at play; abstract architectural details; frenetic street activity; and peaceful park scenes.

26. Vary your focus to get the full picture. If you’re walking down a street, for example, look up at rooftops then look at the names on the door-bells to an apartment block. Experienced hikers do this instinctively in the wild: considering both the vista and the proverbial lily, to get immersed at all levels.

16. If you’re not in Bangkok or some other crazy traffic town, hire a bicycle and ride around the lesser visited neighbourhoods. Inner city neighbourhoods in large cities are rarely indicative of how the majority of the population live. There may not be a big difference, but there’ll be a difference.

Lonely Planetfrom Lonely Planet

The language of photography

Panning. << Panning is the most fun of all the techniques listed here. It involves slowing your shutter speed down (how slow depends on the available light, how fast your lens/camera is, and how fast the subject is moving) and then following the subject as it passes you. The effect is to give the subject more focus than the background. It is quite difficult to blur only the background so don’t worry if the subject is slightly blurred as well — it adds to the dynamism of the shot.

Lonely Planetfrom Lonely Planet

Five travel photography essentials that won't weigh you down

3. Watch the magic Don’t underestimate the power of the humble wristwatch – it enables you to time your activity to coincide with the day’s optimum lighting. Pictures taken just after dawn, before the sun starts to dominate the sky and over-expose everything in its glare, capture subjects in a softer light, coating buildings in amber hues and deepening an image with contrasting shadows.

Lonely Planetfrom Lonely Planet

Five travel photography essentials that won't weigh you down

5. Multi-shot mode and GorillaPod grip Any compact or SLR camera worth its salt will have a ‘sports’ mode or multi-shot feature. The former allows you to shoot with a fast film speed to capture quick moving subjects that would otherwise be blurred, while the latter lets you take a few pictures per second, thus maximising your chances of getting a decent one.

17. Take a compass. Walking around a city becomes easier when you can orientate yourself. A compass also helps to get back on track when you get lost on purpose (or otherwise).

6. Get lost (in a safe area of town, obviously). This is best done on foot, of course. Probably not a good idea to try this in a forest, or any countryside.

ArchDailyfrom ArchDaily

Sydney Architecture Walks / Supple Design

I've walked all around most of what you see here many times. One of the top three harbors and greatest cities in the world.

Lonely Planetfrom Lonely Planet

Five travel photography essentials that won't weigh you down

2. Mini-tripod For close-ups that require steadiness beyond the capability of a human hand a tripod is your best friend. This shot of freshly caught octopus on Nisyros captures the essence of the Greek Islands: fishing and the sea.

Lonely Planetfrom Lonely Planet

Bangkok's best views: top vantage points to admire the Thai capital

Capturing Bangkok from up high.

Lonely Planetfrom Lonely Planet

The language of photography

Contre-jour. << Contre-jour literally means ‘against the day’, but is properly translated from French as ‘against the light’. With the sun or any other bright object directly behind a subject the contrast is increased, making the subject a silhouette against the light source. The resulting images can be drained of colour, but they make up for it with loads of atmosphere.

20. Make travel an experiment. John Steinbeck, for example, used to try to buy something in a city that he thought it couldn’t possibly have. When one shop owner didn’t have it he’d ask where else may. A wild goose chase will make you see a destination differently from a planned series of sights.

Lonely Planetfrom Lonely Planet

Travel gear reviews: from smart shoes to smart gadgets

This edition of our travel gear reviews includes a backpack elegant enough to grace the streets of Milan, a solar-powered gizmo for charging devices on the road and a mat to help you get a good night’s sleep – even if you’re halfway up a mountain.

10. Eat the local food. You don’t have to eat fried insects and the like, but do try a variety of the national or regional dishes. Of course, not only do you improve your understanding of the destination, but you will also get better food. Non-local dishes are rarely very good. For example, from personal experience, I would advise against eating pizza in Fiji.

8. Avoid PDAs. << I mean Public Displays of Affluence (not affection). If you’re travelling abroad then you’re more than likely to be richer than most of the locals, but advertising this fact by wearing gold jewellery or carrying a $ 2000 camera around your neck is not advisable. It makes you a target for thieves. Leave your jewellery at home and keep your camera in a bag when you’re not using it.

25. Obviously, take a guidebook, specifically one that helps you get around (many other guidebook publishers have only arrival guides not travel guides). But remember that they are only guides, not the ten commandments. There are no set ways to see/feel/engage, etc., with a destination.

23. Slow down at museums and galleries. Sure, it’s hard not to try to see it all because you’re thinking you may not return ever again. But getting to know a few pieces well will stay with you longer than browsing the entire exhibition. In other words, most museums are like supermarkets, but try treating them like delicatessens.

y Travel Blogfrom y Travel Blog

43 Travel Tips for First Time travelers

43 Travel Tips for First Time Travelers AND Pros: http://www.ytravelblog.com/tips-for-first-time-travellers/