Researchers find that people who's brains "disassociate with the self" have greater spirituality and feel more a part of a divine plan.

Researchers find that people who's brains "disassociate with the self" have greater spirituality and feel more a part of a divine plan.

Depression Tweaks the Brain's Disappointment Circuit - By Simon Makin, Scientific American - Caption: The Draining Brain of Depression Many regions in the brain that process emotions and reward behave differently in depression, skewing a person's experience toward the negative. Credit: ISTOCKPHOTO

Depression Tweaks the Brain's Disappointment Circuit - By Simon Makin, Scientific American - Caption: The Draining Brain of Depression Many regions in the brain that process emotions and reward behave differently in depression, skewing a person's experience toward the negative. Credit: ISTOCKPHOTO

Anti-psychotic Medications Offer New Hope in the Battle Against Glioblastoma. Les antagonistes de la dopamine pourraient être efficaces dans le traitement du glioblastome.

Anti-psychotic Medications Offer New Hope in the Battle Against Glioblastoma. Les antagonistes de la dopamine pourraient être efficaces dans le traitement du glioblastome.

A real brain with a good view of the cerebral tonsils: the bulging butt hanging out the back in the bottom left corner. This is the portion squished into the brain stem when a person has a #Chiari Malformation

A real brain with a good view of the cerebral tonsils: the bulging butt hanging out the back in the bottom left corner. This is the portion squished into the brain stem when a person has a #Chiari Malformation

Comparison of the frontal lobes among human and other non-human primate species. The connecting lines indicate the evolutionary relationships among the species. Katerina Semendeferi and colleagues found that the frontal lobes in humans are not disproportionately larger than expected for a primate brain of its size. Figure and caption adapted from Passingham (2002).

Comparison of the frontal lobes among human and other non-human primate species. The connecting lines indicate the evolutionary relationships among the species. Katerina Semendeferi and colleagues found that the frontal lobes in humans are not disproportionately larger than expected for a primate brain of its size. Figure and caption adapted from Passingham (2002).

Pinterest
Search