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  • Nicole Arentsen

    Lemongrass: Repels mosquitoes. Plant in pots and place on your porch or patio.

  • Robin Sperry

    Lemongrass: Repels fleas, ticks and mosquitoes. Plant in pots and place on your porch or patio. For around the dog run!

  • Nicki Royce

    Citronella grass is a natural mosquito repellent. I don't have a green thumb but if I did....!!!!

  • Lisa Gould

    citronella - mosquito repelling plant. Perennial clumping grass grows to 5-6 feet. Full sun and well-drained soil. Nitrogen-rich fertilizer once a year. Cybopogon nardus or Citronella winterianus are true varieties that repel mosquitos.

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Most have a nice fragrance and some even attract butterflies and hummingbirds.

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I had no idea that these plants repelled mosquitos. Feeling a little clueless but I am sure I'm not the only one right? Decorating + entertaining with mosquito repelling plants Mandy Bryant Bryant Bryant Bryant Bryant Dewey Generations One Roof

GOOD TO KNOW...Repel mosquitoes with container plants - Here is a helpful list of container plants that repel mosquitoes naturally!

GOOD TO KNOW...Repel mosquitoes with container plants - Here is a helpful list of container plants that repel mosquitoes naturally!

Plants that keep mosquitoes away: Citronella, Horsemint, Marigolds, Ageratum (aka Flossflowers), Catnip. I also saw somewhere that Rosemary, Peppermint, Lemon Balm and Eucalyptus may also help keep them away.

mosquito-repelling kokedama garden - Kokedama is a style of gardening that originates from Japanese bonsai and involves blanketing the roots of a plant in moss, tying it with string and creating a hanging garden with the plants.

5 Easy to Grow Mosquito-Repelling Plants -- 1. Citronella 2. Horsemint 3. Marigolds 4. Ageratum 5. Catnip

Plant these in the garden to repel mosquitoes - won't get rid of them completely, but every little bit helps! All these plants really need to have some direct sunlight on them during the day to get them to grow, even in Houston's tropical climate. ~ Houston Foodlovers