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    The Cosmic Egg in Finnish mythology In the Kalevala, the national epic poem of Finland, the poem begins with an introduction by the singers. The Earth is created from the shards of a duck egg and the first man (Väinämöinen) is born to Ilmatar, goddess of the air. Väinämöinen brings trees and life to the barren world. One egg's lower half transformed And became the earth below, And its upper half transmuted And became the sky above; From the yolk the sun was made, Lig...

    Iku-Turso - A malevolent sea monster in Finnish mythology, mentioned in the Finnish national epic Kalevala

    The Cosmic Egg in Finnish mythology, In the Kalevala, the national epic poem of Finland, the poem begins with an introduction by the singers. The Earth is created from the shards of a duck egg and the first man (Väinämöinen) is born to Ilmatar, goddess of the air. Väinämöinen brings trees and life to the barren world. One egg's lower half transformed And became the earth below, And its upper half transmuted And became the sky above; From the yolk the sun was made...

    Joseph Alanen - Maid of the air. The Kalevala.

    National museum of Finland, Kalevala fresko by Gallen-Kallela

    From The Kalevala, illustrated by M. Mecheva.

    Kalevala plate.

    The Kalevala Dress by Kirsi Neuvonen, is a playful take on the work of Akseli Gallen-Kallela (Finnish artist, 1865–1931). He deeply influenced the Finnish national identity. The dress depicted belonged to his wife, Mary Gallen-Kallela

    In Finnish mythology it was said the Queen of the underworld rode the white stag..bringing its hunters to their unfateful doom.

    Nordic Thoughts: Vintage Kalevala postcards

    Vintage Kalevala postcards illustrations by Yufa

    Finnish Mythology

    Monument based on Kalevala mythology, by Carl Eneas Sjöstrand. Töölö.

    In Dahomey (West African) mythology, Mawu is a creator goddess, associated with the sun and moon. After creating the earth and all life and everything else on it, Mawu asked the primeval serpent, Aido Hwedo, to curl up beneath the earth and hold it up in the sky.

    "Taikamylly" (Sampo, the magical mill; Kalevala) by Marimekko.

    A Gancanagh (from Irish: Gean Cánach meaning "love talker") is a male faerie in Irish mythology that is known for seducing human women. The Gancanagh are thought to have an addictive toxin in their skin that make the humans they seduce literally addicted to them. The women seduced by this type of faerie typically die from the withdrawal, pining away for the Ganacanagh's love or fighting to the death for his love.

    In Persian mythology, peris are descended from fallen angels who have been denied paradise until they have done penance. In earlier sources they are described as agents of evil; later, they are benevolent. They are exquisite, winged, fairy-like creatures ranking between angels and evil spirits.

    Louhi is a queen of the land known as Pohjola in Finnish mythology and the mythology of Lapland. Louhi is described as a powerful witch, with the ability to change shape and weave mighty enchantments. She is also the main opponent of Väinämöinen and his group in the battle for the magical artifact Sampo in the Kalevala. She has a number of beautiful daughters, whom heroes attempt to win their hand. Louhi in true fairy tale form sets them difficult tasks to perform in order to claim such a prize.

    "Morrighan," Emily Balivet, 2011. I'm learning Celtic mythology...why do we only study Roman and Greek, when there are so many other great traditions as well?