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The Cosmic Egg in Finnish mythology In the Kalevala, the national epic poem of Finland, the poem begins with an introduction by the singers. The Earth is created from the shards of a duck egg and the first man (Väinämöinen) is born to Ilmatar, goddess of the air. Väinämöinen brings trees and life to the barren world. One egg's lower half transformed And became the earth below, And its upper half transmuted And became the sky above; From the yolk the sun was made…

The Cosmic Egg in Finnish mythology, In the Kalevala, the national epic poem of Finland, the poem begins with an introduction by the singers. The Earth is created from the shards of a duck egg and the first man (Väinämöinen) is born to Ilmatar, goddess of the air. Väinämöinen brings trees and life to the barren world. One egg's lower half transformed And became the earth below, And its upper half transmuted And became the sky above; From the yolk the sun was made...

In Kalevala, the Finnish national epic, Ilmatar was a virgin Personification of Air. Her Father was Sky, Her Mother was Primal Waters. Her name literally means "female air spirit." In Kalevala, Ilmatar is portrayed as androgynous with both male and female aspects, though she is primarily female. She was impregnated by the sea and wind and thus became the mother of Väinämöinen, the Finnish Creator of Life.

The Finnish-Ugrian goddess Ilmatar was the virgin daughter of Air. she had immense creative powers, and was known as Water Mother, Daughter of Nature, and Sky Mother. Legends say that she created the world and gave birth to the first great hero, Väinämöinen. #suomenusko #finnish #paganism

The earliest known mermaid legends come from Syria around 1000 B.C. where the Syrian Goddess Atargatis dove into a lake to take the form of a fish, but the powers there would not allow her give up her great beauty, so only her bottom half became a fish and she kept her top half in human form. As myths tend to do, the story changed over time and Atargatis became mixed with Syrian goddess Ashtarte, who is generally considered the counterpart to Greek mythology's Aphrodite.

The Kalevala - A 19th-century work of epic poetry compiled by Elias Lönnrot from Karelian and Finnish oral folklore and mythology. It is regarded as the national epic of Karelia and Finland and is one of the most significant works of Finnish literature. The Kalevala played an instrumental role in the development of the Finnish national identity, the intensification of Finland's language strife and the growing sense of nationality that ultimately led to Finland's independence from Russia in…

Ilmatar and Sotka - The Air Maiden and the Goldeneye by Aarre Aaltonen. Ilmatar is a figure from the FInnish National Epos The Kalevala. Ilmatar was a goddess in heaven who got bored in her life above the clouds. So she came down on earth and landed on open sea. A bird, a Goldeneye, sat on her knee and laid an egg which became the earth. Ilmatar also gave birth to Väinämöinen, who is the greatest hero in the Finnish Mythology. The Statue is located at the Sibelius Park in Töölö.

Suomen kansallismuseo, National Museum of Finland, Helsinki. The National Museum of Finland presents Finnish history from the Stone Age to the present day, through objects and cultural history.

Kuu is a Moon goddess in Finnish mythology. According to the Kalevala, the daughter of the air Ilmatar allowed a teal to lay its egg on her knee as she floated in the abyss. The egg fell and its parts formed the universe: the white of the egg became the moon, and the yolk the sun.

Yemaya means “Mother Whose Children are the Fish” to reflect the fact that her children are uncountable. She also rules over maternity in our lives as she is the Mother of All. She Who Gives Birth to All of Life, Yemaya is aligned with the power of creation flowing through all that is. In this aspect, she assists with remembering, reclaiming and activating our own innate creative power, realizing our true and natural ability to create and experience magnificence within our life.

The Goddess Inanna in breast-offering pose. As early as 3500 B.C.E. Inanna was worshiped as the great Goddess of Sumeria. Also known as Queen of Heaven and Earth, Priestess of Heaven, Light of the World, First Daughter of the Moon, Righteous Justice, Holy Shepherdess, and Loud Thundering Storm.