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Edith Wilson, first lady, hat worn while volunteering with the Red Cross during WW1. At the Smithsonian

Ida Mckinley Biography :: National First Ladies' Library | | Ida McKinley, née Ida Saxton (born June 8, 1847, Canton, Ohio, U.S.—died May 26, 1907, Canton), American first lady (1897–1901), the wife of William McKinley, 25th president of the United States | | (following her husband’s assassination) “Nothing can make me happy again. . .”

Ida McKinley. The family still has the wing shaped diamond tiara shown in this photo (you can see a wing just below the base of the feather on the right side of her head). The McKinley Presidential Library & Museum has borrowed it for special events in the past.

25th First Lady of the White House Ida McKinley wife of President William McKinley.

Ida Saxton McKinley. Married to William McKinley, in office 1897-1901. First Lady Ida Saxton McKinley (June 8, 1847 – May 26, 1907), wife of William McKinley, was First Lady of the United States from 1897 to 1901. 25th #President of the United States 26th #FirstLady

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Ida McKinley

Ida McKinley..... A tender hearted women who dearly loved her husband, William. Together they grieved the loss of two babies. Ida never recovered from the heart break. She also suffered from seizures. President McKinley broke protocol during White House dinners in order to have his wife seated next to him. He was aware of an impending seizure and he would cover her face with a handkerchief without missing a beat of conversation. So devoted was he that when he was shot, his only…

First Lady Ida Saxton McKinley (June 8, 1847 – May 26, 1907), wife of William McKinley, was First Lady of the United States from 1897 to 1901. 25th #President of the United States 26th #FirstLady

Mamie Eisenhower: The General’s Lady as First Lady, pictured here in her Inaugural Gown As the Eisenhowers prepared to enter the White House, newspaper and magazine stories discussed Mamie Eisenhower’s clothes, her bangs, her happy family, and her open and friendly style. The stories assured Americans that the new first lady’s years of experience as a military wife, including entertaining dignitaries as the wife of the NATO Supreme Allied Commander Europe, made her uniquely qualified to…

Eleanor Roosevelt wore this pink rayon crepe gown trimmed with lace and sequins to the 1945 inaugural reception. It was designed by Arnold Constable.

The public’s fascination with Frances Cleveland led to her image appearing on more photographs, souvenirs, and advertising paraphernalia than any other 19th-century first lady.