WorthPoint
• 3 years ago

Use the Screws to Help Identify the Age of Your Furniture - This is an early machine-cut screw, a vast improvement over the handmade example. Like the handmade version, it is still cylindrical with no taper or point but the threads are consistent and sharp. But the head still has a problem. It was still handmade at this point, circa 1815-1820, and the slot was still hand cut and off center.

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Many of the Glasier photos were taken at Buffalo Bill’s Real Wild West show, including portraits of some of the American Indian performers in the show. This is Chief Iron Tail, who was a survivor of the Battle of the Little Big Horn. He was one of the models chosen for the image on the Buffalo Nickel. Check out this awesome WorthPoint article!

Mademoiselle Scheel, a brave young lady, seems perfectly at ease with these kings of the jungle. This Glasier photo was taken about 1905. Check out this awesome WorthPoint article!

Clown Pete Mardo, photographed by Frederick Glasier, appeared with Barnum & Bailey and later with Ringling Bros. This was before the two shows were combined. An exhibit of Glasier’s photos at the Tampa Bay History Center will run through Aug. 4. Check out this awesome WorthPoint article!

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This is an original double-sided “Michael Collins” movie poster. It is a first print of “Michael Collins” holding a rifle in air in front of the Irish flag. It was later recalled in favor of a more peaceful version. It sold on eBay for $20 in 2011. Check out this awesome WorthPoint article!

This life-sized carving of an American Indian chief, carved in the last quarter of the 19th century is also attributed to Brooks. It is painted in bright, polychrome enamel and features an outstretched right arm holding a bundle of cigars while another bundle of cigars is in the crook of his left arm. Despite missing the original carved wooden rifle, it realized $21,850 in auction in 2006 at Cowan’s Auctions. Check out this awesome WorthPoint article!

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Cigar store Indians were a must for e\very reputable tobacco shop in the United States. In terms of folk art, cigar store Indian statues have become one of the most popular categories purchased today, according to Nancy Druckman, who has served as the director for the American Folk Art Department at Sotheby’s for 30 years. Check out this awesome WorthPoint article!

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This 19-century life-sized carving of an Indian scout, right hand raised above forehead, is attributed to Thomas V. Brooks of New York. An example of the golden age of cigar store Indians, it sold for $34,500 at Cowan’s auctions in 2007. Check out this awesome WorthPoint article!

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