transit of venus

Milky Way, The Moon, and Earth in One Photo

Visualizing The Size And Scale Of Our World via all that is interesting #Infographic #Solar_System

Mercury, Venus, and Saturn align with the Pyramids of Giza for the first time in 2,737 years on December 3, 2012

Transit of Venus 2012 by NASA/SDO via the atlantic.com: A close view of Venus passing in front of the Sun, seen from NASA's orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory, on June 5, 2012. #Transit_of_Venus #NASA #theatlantic

Venus Transit 2012

This image provided by NASA shows the Solar Dynamic Observatory's ultra-high-definition view of Venus, black dot at top center, passing in front of the sun on Tuesday, June 5, 2012. The next transit of Venus won't be for another 105 years.

Combined visible and infra-red light images of star forming region Sharpless 2-106. This nebula is located about 2,000 light-years away in the direction of the constellation Cygnus. It is 2 light-years long and 1/2 a light-year across. The central star of this nebula is more than 15 times the mass of our Sun. It formed less 100,000 years ago, making this one of the youngest star-forming regions known.

Phoenix Nebula

This photo from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope shows an ominous pillar of gas and dust known as the Cone Nebula. The image shows the top portion of the nebula that is 2.5 light years in height. The Cone Nebula is 2,500 light-years from Earth in the Monoceros constellation. The red halo of light seen around the pillar is caused when ultraviolet radiation causes hydrogen gas in the nebula to glow.

M64 stars orbit clockwise as seen in this image.However, recent detailed studies have led to the remarkable discovery that the interstellar gas in the outer regions of M64 rotates in the opposite direction from the gas and stars in the inner regions. The inner region has a radius of only approximately 3,000 light-years, while the outer section extends another 40,000 light-years. This pattern is believed to trigger the creation of many new stars around the boundary separating the two regions

Zeta Ophiuchus, a massive star plowing through the gas and dust floating in space. Zeta Oph is a bruiser, with 20 times the Sun’s mass. It’s an incredibly luminous star, blasting out light at a rate 80,000 times higher than the Sun! Even at its distance of 400 light years or so, it should be one of the brightest stars in the sky … yet it actually appears relatively dim to the eye.

A real shooting star! Mira (MY-rah) is a star that scientists have studied for 400 years. But NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer telescope captured a very surprising image of Mira. It showed for the first time that Mira has a long tail of dust and gas—13 light-years long! That is 20,000 times longer than the average distance from the Sun to Pluto! Credit: NASA

NASA image of the sun captured December 8, 2010 by Solar Dynamics Observatory

eclipse from space

#Astronomy: NASA spacecraft New Horizons is currently en route to the #Pluto-Charon system, estimated arrival date July 14, 2015.

Flame Nebula

volcano, seen from space

A true sun rise

Earthshine and Venus Over Sierra de Guadarrama. the Earth's Moon was caught just above the horizon in a young crescent phase. The familiar Moon might look a bit odd as the exposure shows significant Earthshine -- the illumination of the part of the Moon hidden from direct sunlight by the sun-reflecting Earth. Also captured in the image is the bright planet Venus on the right.