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Death Photographers, Posts Mortem Photographers, Victorian Death, Death Photography, Postmortem Photo, Photography Meant, Posts Mortem Photography, Death Photo 7, Victorian Posts Mortem

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[Photograph of a young girl on a chair] Author/Creator: Shew, William, 1820-1903. Part of: Carl Mautz collection of cartes-de-visite photographs created by California photographers.

As you can see there is a standing post behind the girl. And she is ALIVE! This is not a postmortem photo. There is no such thing as a standing PM photo. Her eyes are painted in. This is because the exposure time was more then 10 minutes and eyelids move thus become blurry on the photo.

Standing post mortems are an urban legend. Stands were used to steady people for long exposure times used in photography at that time. It's impossible to prop up a dead person in this fashion! The stand couldn't hold up that much 'dead weight', the mouth would hang open, and the head and limbs would flop down. Could a person even hold up a dead child and have her look natural? No, and a stand can't do it either!

Another pinner said:This is the creepiest one and what is on her lips?? Yikes... Before their burial, the deceased would be photographed in their best clothes and 'posing' (propped up) with their living relatives. In some instances, eyes were painted onto the closed eyelids of the deceased to make them appear alive. In Victorian times when photographs were rare, this might be the only photo the family had of their dearly departed.

Her intense gaze and the beautiful doll both help make this Victorian portrait an especially memorable one. 1800s

This was said to be a postmortem. However, a base was used to steady a living person, not to prop up a dead person. Source: Wikipedia.

Photos became more affordable to the lower and middle class with the invention of the daguerrotpye in 1839. During the Victorian Era, the infant and child mortality rate was high. Often, death photos were the only picture a family may ever have of their child. This practice is considered taboo in America, but is still an accepted practice in many parts of the World.

17 Haunting Post-Mortem Photographs From The 1800s -- WHICH ONE IS FREAKIN' DEAD!?

post mortem. So damned creepy its fascinating.

It looks like someone is behind the curtain holding his head, but he standing alone and is alive.