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    “Let the future tell the truth, and evaluate each one according to his work and accomplishments. The present is theirs; the future, for which I have really worked, is mine.” -Nikola Tesla (Soviet playing cards, Mayan design)

    ace of spades skull card Skulls and the macabre has always appealed to me. Like this card. (re-pin)

    As it happens Mayan motives were popular in Soviet times in Russia. The only vendor for playing cards (as for many other stuff in Soviet Russia) was the Soviet State, so there were only a few type of the cards – just maybe ten at most, not hundreds or thousands as in free market societies, and one of the types of the playing cards were devoted to the Mayan culture for some reason.

    Although this is a Soviet artist's fanciful depiction of a Mesoamerican deck, the four suits of the Aztec ritual calendar and the New Fire Ceremony (where four bundles of 13 reeds each were burned to celebrate a new cycle) show that the calendar preserved in the card deck was part of an ancient system of knowledge known worldwide.

    As it happens Mayan motives were popular in Soviet times in Russia. The only vendor for playing cards (as for many other stuff in Soviet Russia) was the Soviet State, so there were only a few type of the cards – just maybe ten at most, not hundreds or thousands as in free market societies, and one of the types of the playing cards were devoted to the Mayan culture for some reason.

    As it happens Mayan motives were popular in Soviet times in Russia. The only vendor for playing cards (as for many other stuff in Soviet Russia) was the Soviet State, so there were only a few type of the cards – just maybe ten at most, not hundreds or thousands as in free market societies, and one of the types of the playing cards were devoted to the Mayan culture for some reason.

    Playing Card; South Netherlandish, ca. 1470-80 - Two watermarks appear in the paper of these cards. One is in the form of a fork-tailed Gothic letter "p" surmounted by a quatrefoil and appears at least in part, on the 2 of Nooses, the 2 of Dog Collars and the queen of Horns. The other is a shield with the letters "iado" surmounted by a crozier which appears, at least in part, on the 1,5,8 and 10 of Dog Collars, the 1,2 and knave of Nooses and the 8 of Horns.