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Richard Meyer
Richard Meyer • 3 years ago

Only 15% of bosses described their own management style as commanding. About 23% of employees, on the other hand, reported their boss’s style to be commanding, and just 11% said being commanding was the desired style.

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If you're afraid of not checking your work email on holidays and on the weekend, then you are in the wrong job. Don't get me wrong, there are times when we are on tight deadlines, but while other industrialized countries are giving workers more time off American workers still take less vacation time and work more hours.

At a time when the buzzwords in corporate America are innovation, disruption, and game-changers — all actions that require recruiting the best talent in the marketplace — organizations, instead, are artificially creating bureaucratic inefficiencies that are inexcusably cumbersome and that result in the creation of legions of antagonists

Who you hire makes all the difference, but it’s not all about what’s on their resume, especially not at a startup. Once you have a group of candidates who are technically qualified for the position, then you need to make sure you hire people who are excited about the position and even more importantly about the company.

From Harvard Business Review comes this great article: Most American workers aren’t interested in becoming managers. At least, that’s what a new CareerBuilder survey seems to suggest.

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We hear a lot about a “personal brand” today and frankly I don’t buy any of it.  I really don’t believe that any employer really cares about your personal brand all they want to know is “how can you provide value to my company?”   Still there are a lot of people out there with egos that need to stroked who believe the hype around their personal brand.  The key question, though, that anyone should ask is “what is your brand equity which means what the hell have you actually done beyond self prom…

“Middle managers do everything…I mean doing paperwork to doing physical work. Not only that, reporting what is going on with the company every single day. It may not seem a lot of work, but it is very stressful at the end of the day.” That quote is from an article in the Wall Street Journal on middle managers.  When asked to do more today the burden usually falls on middle managers who are getting burnt out as the work more hours and take home less money.

In addition to being disconnected more than 80% of American workers report job related stress.  With Americans working more hours for less money and the job market still running on “snail slow” a lot of employees are just going through the motions.

Both layoffs and furloughs can create behavioral issues and costs, and you could argue that furloughs are tougher in some ways.But one fact remains: Layoffs are much more disruptive to an organization in both the short and the long term. Even employees who stay are extremely distracted, because they’ve lost friends and are worried about their own jobs. To me, that’s no way to run a railroad.

It’s been said that Millennials want to change the workplace and I can see why. It’s more important to know that you left your mark on a business and actually did something than to come in everyday and just do “work”. If an executive in your company says he wants change beware that when you start to implement change he will be there to have your back.