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Explore Beauchamp Tower, Prisoner Graffiti, and more!

Prisoner graffiti - carved into the walls of Beauchamp Tower at the Tower of London. Very creepy!

"Jane" carved into the wall of a room in the Beauchamp Tower in the Tower of London. It is believed (no absolute proof available) that it was carved by Guildford Dudley, husband of Lady Jane Grey. They were both executed (along with a number of other people) for trying to put Jane on the throne.

Thomas More's prison cell was the ground floor of the Bell Tower in the Tower of London, where he was imprisoned from April 1534 to July 1535. It had no glass in what served as windows and was directly above the Tower's moat, close to the Thames River. Photograph by Tommy Heyne

Keys and lantern used to lock the Tower of London each night ~ Known as The Ceremony of the Keys it takes place every night at the Tower of London, and has done so since the 14th century. Read about it at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceremony_of_the_Keys

Wingfield Manor, Derbyshire, England. Abandoned since 1770, this monument to late medieval ‘conspicuous consumption’ was built in the 1440s for the wealthy Ralph, Lord Cromwell, Treasurer of England. Later the home of Bess of Hardwick’s husband, the Earl of Shrewsbury, who imprisoned Mary Queen of Scots here in 1569, 1584 and 1585. That woman could just not catch a break.

*HOUSE OF THE VETTII: Pompeii, date: 79 AD destroyed. Current location: Pompeii, Napoli, Campania, Italy. The House of Vetti preserves exceptional examples of pompeian wall-paintings. It is one of the few Pompeian house to have all of the wall paintings, furniture, + artifacts discovered there remain in place, rather than removed (+often sold) as in earlier centuries.

Roman couch and footstool with bone carvings and glass inlays Roman 1st century CE possibly from the villa of co-emperor Lucius Verus 161-169 CE (2)

BuzzFeed Communityfrom BuzzFeed Community

Community Post: The Last Words Of 17 Historical Figures

Napoleon Bonaparte / Vespasian / The Last Words Of 17 Historical Figures (via BuzzFeed)

Howard Carter opening the sarcophagus of King Tutankhamun in 1924

Paddle Doll, Egypt, 2030–1802 B.C. The so-called paddle doll consists of a flat piece of wood depicting the torso, rudimentary arms and neck of a woman, with a thick shock of "hair" made of beads strung on linen thread. The body is often painted with jewelry, textile patterns or tattoos. Contrary to their name, these "dolls" were not toys. The key-hole shape of the body is similar to the counterpoise of the menat necklaces that were used as percussion instruments during religious ceremonies.