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U.S. Census Bureau employees tabulate data using  one of the agency’s UNIVAC computers, ca. 1960. Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

U.S. Census Bureau employees tabulate data using one of the agency’s UNIVAC computers, ca. 1960. Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

Historic Jeffersonville, IN Census Bureau

Fire drill at the Census Bureau’s National Processing Center in Jeffersonville, IN, ca. Learn more about Census history at: www.

Census Bureau clerks transfer data contained on the 1940 Census questionnaire to punch cards for tabulation. #CensusHistory Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

“Card Punch Operators working on population cards. A total of punchers were employed and punch machines of all types were used in the 1940 Census”

Transferring data from the 1940 census questionnaire to punch cards for tabulation. Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

Transferring data from the 1940 census questionnaire to punch cards for tabulation. Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

U.S. Census Bureau clerks cut and fold questionnaires in preparation for the Unemployment Census conducted in November 1937. Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

U.S. Census Bureau clerks cut and fold questionnaires in preparation for the Unemployment Census conducted in November 1937. Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

#CensusHistory A U.S. Census Bureau clerk uses a pantograph (ca. 1908) to translate data on a census schedule to a punch card.  The punch cards were “read” by the electronic tabulators developed by Herman Hollerith for the 1890 Census. Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

#CensusHistory A U.S. Census Bureau clerk uses a pantograph (ca. 1908) to translate data on a census schedule to a punch card. The punch cards were “read” by the electronic tabulators developed by Herman Hollerith for the 1890 Census. Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

A Census Bureau employee uses a Ferranti Tape Reader in the 1960s to communicate with one of our #UNIVAC 1105 computers. Learn more here: http://www.census.gov/history/www/innovations/technology/univac_i.html

A Census Bureau employee uses a Ferranti Tape Reader in the 1960s to communicate with one of our #UNIVAC 1105 computers. Learn more here: http://www.census.gov/history/www/innovations/technology/univac_i.html

Free Photo Archive of over 26,000 vintage photographs. Find people and the places were they lived.  Search for your surnames.  Find photos of your ancestors.  Make connections with genealogy cousins. Add your family's photos.

Could spend some time on here. Free Photo Archive of over vintage photographs. Find people and the places were they lived. Search for your surnames. Find photos of your ancestors. Make connections with genealogy cousins.

Newspapers and radio shared the news of the final 1940 Census results. The Census Bureau reported that 132.2 million people lived in the United States.

Newspapers and radio shared the news of the final 1940 Census results. The Census Bureau reported that million people lived in the United States.

1940 Card Punches Two women working with two types of card punches used to create punch cards.

1940 Image Gallery - History Sights and Sounds

U.S. Census Bureau director Robert Groves begins the house-to-house interviews in the remote Inupiat Eskimo village of Noorvik, Alaska, on January 20, 2010. Residents of Anchorage, Fairbanks and other larger Alaskan cities received 2010 census questionnaires in the mail in mid-March, like the rest of the country. Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

U.S. Census Bureau director Robert Groves begins the house-to-house interviews in the remote Inupiat Eskimo village of Noorvik, Alaska, on January 20, 2010. Residents of Anchorage, Fairbanks and other larger Alaskan cities received 2010 census questionnaires in the mail in mid-March, like the rest of the country. Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history/

U.S. Census Bureau director Robert Groves is shuttled around the Inupiat Eskimo village of Noorvik, Alaska to conduct the first interviews of the 2010 census. The census is conducted in remote Alaska earlier than the rest of the country so dogsleds, all-terrain vehicles and snowmobiles can reach remote villages.  Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history

U.S. Census Bureau director Robert Groves is shuttled around the Inupiat Eskimo village of Noorvik, Alaska to conduct the first interviews of the 2010 census. The census is conducted in remote Alaska earlier than the rest of the country so dogsleds, all-terrain vehicles and snowmobiles can reach remote villages. Learn more at http://www.census.gov/history

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