Explore Ottoman Empire, Boil Cabbage Recipe, and more!

NYT Cooking: This is a Swedish version of a dish with roots in the Ottoman Empire, an infidel’s version of Turkish dolmas, made not with lamb and grape leaves but with ground pork and beef cloaked with deeply caramelized cabbage. It is served here with lingonberry preserves cut with vinegar and Worcestershire sauce, and made velvet with butter. The dish goes beautifully with boiled p...

Kalpudding (Meatloaf With Caramelized Cabbage)

Scandinavian Kalpudding (Meatloaf With Caramelized Cabbage) - NYT Cooking

Cabbage caramelizes when you give it a long-enough time in the oven. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Cabbage and Potato Gratin Makes a Rich Vegetarian Meal

NYT Cooking: Like slow-cooked onions, slow-cooked cabbage takes on color, becoming meltingly tender and sweet. Because of the bulk of the potatoes, this gratin makes a satisfying vegetarian main dish, though it certainly works just as well as a side.

Crispy Sticky Mongolian Beef - PF Chang's copycat, done right! Less oil, all the flavor and not stickly sweet. Easy!

Crispy Sticky Mongolian Beef

Crispy Sticky Mongolian Beef - PF Chang's copycat, done right! Less oil, all the flavor and not stickly sweet. food recipe Share and Enjoy!

NYT Cooking: This classic stick-to-your-ribs stew is the ideal project for a chilly weekend. Beef, onion, carrots, potatoes and red wine come together in  cozy harmony. If you are feeding a crowd, good news: It doubles (or triples) beautifully.

Old-Fashioned Beef Stew

This classic stick-to-your-ribs stew is the ideal project for a chilly weekend Beef, onion, carrots, potatoes and red wine come together in cozy harmony If you are feeding a crowd, good news: It doubles (or triples) beautifully.

In France, meatballs are called boulettes, and by far the favorite versions are the spice-scented North African type Most of the neighborhood Tunisian and Moroccan restaurants in Paris offer them, served as an appetizer or a side, or in a fragrant main-course tagine with couscous This recipe is an amalgam of several that I found on my bookshelf, among them one called boulettes tangéroises in an old French cookbook

North African Meatballs

NYT Cooking: In France, meatballs are called boulettes, and by far the favorite versions are the spice-scented North African type.

In the Burgundy region of France, home of Dijon, pork chops are traditionally served in a sauce made with mustard, cream and white wine, and there are very few pairings that are better Richard Olney, a prominent food writer and authority on French cooking, sautéed sliced apples and chops and then baked them all together with cream and mustard dribbled on top I prefer the method here, but you could always fry up some apples and serve them on the side

Pork Chops With Dijon Sauce

NYT Cooking: In the Burgundy region of France, home of Dijon, pork chops are traditionally served in a sauce made with mustard, cream and white wine, and there are very few pairings that are better.

NYT Cooking: In France, meatballs are called boulettes, and by far the favorite versions are the spice-scented North African type. Most of the neighborhood Tunisian and Moroccan restaurants in Paris offer them, served as an appetizer or a side, or in a fragrant main-course tagine with couscous. <br/><br/>This recipe is an amalgam of several that I found on my bookshelf, among them one ...

North African Meatballs

NYT Cooking: In France, meatballs are called boulettes, and by far the favorite versions are the spice-scented North African type.

Butter chicken is the General Tso’s of Indian food, a great, ever-evolving, cross-continental dish found in Delhi, London, New York, Perth and most points in between. In its purest form, it is yogurt-and-spice-marinated chicken dressed in a velvety red bath comprising butter, onions, ginger and tomatoes scented with garam masala, cumin and turmeric, with a cinnamon tang. (Photo: Sarah Anne Ward for The New York Times)

Butter Chicken

Got to try this - yogurt-and-spice-marinated chicken dressed in a velvety red bath comprised of butter, onions, ginger and tomatoes scented with garam masala, cumin and turmeric, with a cinnamon tang.

NYT Cooking: Making a compound of unsalted butter and the salty, fungal deliciousness of Japanese miso paste is a surefire way of adding immense flavor to a simple weeknight meal. Here the mixture is spread over chicken thighs, which are then roasted to golden perfection. But you could easily use it on salmon or flounder, on corn or potatoes. The recipe calls for white miso, which is more mild than the aged version known as red miso. But you could certainly use red for a more intense result.

Miso Chicken

NYT Cooking: Making a compound of unsalted butter and the salty, fungal deliciousness of Japanese miso paste is a surefire…

This is a Swedish version of a dish with roots in the Ottoman Empire, an infidel’s version of Turkish dolmas, made not with lamb and grape leaves but with ground pork and beef cloaked with deeply caramelized cabbage It is served here with lingonberry preserves cut with vinegar and Worcestershire sauce, and made velvet with butter The dish goes beautifully with boiled potatoes

Kalpudding (Meatloaf With Caramelized Cabbage)

Port Braised Lamb Shanks - easy to make slow cooked lamb shanks in an incredible port wine sauce! www.recipetineats.com

Port Braised Lamb Shanks

This recipe, which is adapted from “Julia and Jacques at Home” by Julia Child and Jacques Pépin and was featured in a New York Times article about roast chicken, makes delicious use of leftovers (it would be excellent with the Thanksgiving turkey remainders as well). It is rich, but packed with vegetables You can substitute dried tarragon for fresh, but use less than a tablespoon, and season to taste. (Photo: Craig Lee for NYT)

Chicken-Tarragon Pot Pie

NYT Cooking: Chicken Tarragon Pot Pie This recipe is adapted from “Julia and Jacques at Home” by Julia Child and Jacques Pépin and was featured in a New York Times article about roast chicken.

There are a few cool tricks to this recipe, one of which I picked up from an old issue of Bon Appétit, one I learned from Robb Walsh, the great Tex-Mex scholar and restaurateur who runs El Real Tex-Mex in Houston, and a final one I learned by happenstance. (Photo: Melina Hammer for The New York Times)

Enchiladas Con Carne

Bon Appétit, one I learned from Robb Walsh, the great Tex-Mex scholar and restaurateur who runs El Real Tex-Mex in Houston.

This lighter, brighter version of the classic Italian pasta dish is adapted from one found in “Almost Meatless: Recipes That Are Better for Your Health and the Planet”

Springtime Spaghetti Carbonara

This is a lighter, brighter version of the classic Italian pasta dish. It is incredibly simple – if you can chop vegetables, boil water and whisk eggs, you can make this dish – but it's also indubitably luxurious. Everyone will think you slaved for hours

NYT Cooking: Not every version of butter chicken uses butter. Coconut milk gives this slow-cooker chicken its creamy richness. This is a fast recipe for the cook: Just prep it earlier in the day, even during your morning routine, getting your onion and spices going on the stove while simultaneously making lunches for grumpy children, folding dish towels, feeding the dogs and wondering ...

Slow-Cooker Butter Chicken

Slow Cooker Butter Chicken NYT Cooking: Not every version of butter chicken uses butter. Coconut milk gives this slow-cooker chicken its creamy richness. This is a fast recipe for the cook:

This recipe is by Melissa Clark and takes 20 minutes. Tell us what you think of it at The New York Times - Dining - Food.

Cumin Lamb Meatballs With Tahini Yogurt Dipping Sauce

Pinterest
Search