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Margaret Howe holding an “Oregon” shield in Washington D.C. at a women’s suffrage march in 1913. Oregon women obtained the right to vote in 1912.

Actress Margaret Vale Howe, a participant in the suffrage parade in Washington, D., in March of 1913

Margaret Vale Howe, niece of President Wilson, at New York Suffrage Parade in 1915. The Alaska Territorial Legislature approved women’s right to vote as its first official act in 1913.

WOMAN SUFFRAGE: Margaret Vale Howe, niece of President Wilson, at New York Suffrage Parade in The Alaska Territorial Legislature approved women’s right to vote as its first official act in

La Segunda Ola del FEMINISMO:   El Feminismo Liberal Sufragista. Consolidando el modelo sociopolítico  liberal.

1913 - 300 women known as the Army of the Hudson marched from New York to Washington D. in pursuit of their right to vote.

Women Vote - "Night of Terror" On November 15, let's remember the ladies who went before us.

Women Vote - "Night of Terror" (Women`s Suffrage/Woman`s Rights) for caden other kids won't be able to pay attention

Suffragette by Theresa Thompson, via Flickr

THE VOTE: Suffragette. Many leaders of the movement were upper and upper middle class women.

Propaganda Postcards From The Early 20th Century Show The Dangers Of Women's Rights

Propaganda Postcards From The Early 20th Century Show The Dangers Of Women’s Rights

vintage everyday: These Ridiculous Propaganda Postcards Warn Men about the Dangers of Women’s Rights from the Early Century

Historic Vote: Women in New York City participate in their first election in 1922

Historic Vote: Women in New York City participate in their first election in 1922 women-i-admire

Women cast their vote for president for the first time in November 1920. This was one of the changes taking place in the United States during the 1920s.

Women cast their vote for president for the first time in November This was one of the changes taking place in the United States during the

Dorothy Newell, an outgoing young woman with a sense of humor, promotes women's enfranchisement by wearing the words "Votes for Women" emblazoned on her back. Suffragists tirelessly publicized their cause in more conventional print forms, churning out banners, flyers, posters, articles, and newspapers © Underwood & Underwood/Underwood & Underwood/Corbis.

Dorothy Newell, an outgoing young woman with a sense of humor, promotes women's enfranchisement by wearing the words "Votes for Women" emblazoned on her

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