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    Wangari Maathai 1940- GREEN ACTIVIST The first environmentalist and first African woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize, Maathai was beaten and jailed as a leader of Kenya's democracy movement. She rallies women to plant trees (more than 45 million so far, in Africa, America, and elsewhere), thus creating jobs for the poor, fighting deforestation and erosion, and creating lots of nice oxygen for all of us.

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    • Shani Thompson

      Article written for the magazine Good Housekeeping about 125 women of influence including Wangari Maathai, the first female African environmental activist to win the Nobel Peace Prize. She helped create jobs for woman by encouraging them to plant trees in Kenya. She was beaten and jailed pursuing her life's mission.

    • Mariam Alfred

      Wangari Maathai 1940- GREEN ACTIVIST The first environmentalist and first African woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize, Maathai was beaten and jailed as a leader of Kenya's democracy movement. She rallies women to plant trees (more than 45 million so far, in Africa, America) fighting deforestation and erosion, and creating lots of nice oxygen for all of us.

    • Pamela Boyce Simms

      Wangari Maathai 1940- GREEN ACTIVIST The first environmentalist and first African woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize

    • Mirth

      Wangari Maathai was the first #environmentalist and first #African woman to win the #NobelPeacePrize. Maathai was beaten and jailed as a leader of #Kenya's #democracy movement. She rallied women to plant #trees (more than 45 million so far, in #Africa, #America, and elsewhere), thus creating #jobs for the poor, fighting #deforestation and erosion, and creating lots of nice oxygen for all of us. Dr. Maathai died of complications arising from ovarian cancer in Nairobi in 2011.

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