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Vortograph by Simon Gardiner vortograph urban process cityscapes #Photography #Art #Street #City #Urban

The vortograph, invented in the early 1900s by Alvin Coburn, was arguably the first form of abstract (or “non-objective”) photography. Very surreal ideas taking place with the use of spirals and cityscapes

Silhouettes

Silhouettes

Silhouettes

“La Faune Et La Flore” In Collaboration With French Artist, Moon: http://www.circleme.com/activities/2293266 #photography #picture

From up Northfrom From up North

More Stunning Photography Inspiration

More Stunning Photography Inspiration | From up North

Here is a photo that I feel can teach both photography and studio artists. LEADING LINES. They tell the viewer where to look. This can be effective in any form of art. Try this at least once, please.

eleven, abstract Rob Cherry Photography - Landscape & Fine Art Photography

500px ISOfrom 500px ISO

How To Create Beautiful Bokeh Images

How To Create Beautiful Bokeh Images. Photographer: Ursula Abresch. "In this tutorial, Ursula reveals how she shot and processed “Seedling” so you too can recreate this eye-catching effect..." http://iso.500px.com/bokeh-photo-tutorial/

Captivating series of photographs by Bing Wright, capturing the effects of "Broken Mirror/Evening Light"

Photographer: Fabio Interra Photography Hair/Makeup: Stefania Gilardi Assistant: Valerio Frigerio Model: Martina Campanelli

Student Art Guidefrom Student Art Guide

100+ Creative Photography Ideas

Use mirrors to create illusions, as in this self-portrait by 18 year old photographer Laura Williams

Japanese photographer Shinichi Maruyama has an interesting series of photos simply titled, “Nude.” Each image shows an abstract flesh-colored shape that’s created by a nude subject dancing in front of the camera. Although the photographs look like long-exposure shots, they’re actually composite images created by combining ten thousand individual photographs of each dancer. The result is a look in which each model’s body is (mostly) lost within the blur of its movement.