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"When the Japanese mend broken objects, they aggrandize the damage by filling the cracks with gold. They believe that when something's suffered damage and has a history it becomes more beautiful." -- Billie Mobayed

kintsukuroi ~ “to repair with gold”; the art of repairing pottery with gold or silver lacquer and understanding that the piece is more beautiful for having been broken

Kintsugi: "It is a practice in Japan where they mend cracked or broken ceramics with gold, rendering the piece even more beautiful than it started out. The idea behind it is not to hide the ugliness and brokenness but instead to use gold to make it shine; to illuminate and expose the damage. And at the end of the process the piece is even more beautiful having been broken." Amen, I say.

金継ぎのくらわんか茶碗 Kintsukuroi or kintsugi is the art of healing broken pottery with lacquer and silver or gold. The philosophy behind this reparation is that something should not be discarded just because it is broken. It is in fact more beautiful for having been broken.

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An American sailor passionately kisses a nurse as thousands jam into Times Square to celebrate the long-awaited victory over Japan in World War II.

Kintsukuroi or kintsugi is the art of healing broken pottery with lacquer and silver or gold. The philosophy behind this reparation is that something should not be discarded just because it is broken. It is in fact more beautiful for having been broken.

The Cherokee never had princesses. This is a concept based on European folktales and has no reality in Cherokee history and culture. In fact, Cherokee women were very powerful. They owned all the houses and fields, and they could marry and divorce as they pleased. Kinship was determined through the mother's line. Clan mothers administered justice in many matters. Beloved women were very special women chosen for their outstanding qualities. As in other aspects of Cherokee culture, there was a…

kintsukuroi - the practice of repairing broken ceramics with gold leaf, and understanding that the piece is better for having been broken