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The First Edition Covers of 25 Classic Books

1st ed., A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, by Betty Smith. Harper & Brothers, New York, 1943

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The First Edition Covers of 25 Classic Books

Primera edición de "Lolita"

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Jungle Book Literary Journal

5"x7" gold foil journal with 142 lined pages and built-in bookplate. Made in the USA and printed by an FSC®-Certified printer.

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The 50 Scariest Books of All Time

Kafka The trial Der Prozess

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The First Edition Covers of 25 Classic Books

Ive read this one, but would like to read it again. The First Edition Covers of 25 Classic Books: Nineteen Eighty-Four, by George Orwell. Secker and Warburg, London, 1949. Cover design by Michael Kennard.

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The First Edition Covers of 25 Classic Books

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Penguin Classic’s list of “100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die”

100 Classic Books You Must Read Before You Die - how many have you read? I was on 68, the last time I checked...

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25 Beautifully Redesigned Classic Book Covers

25 Beautifully Redesigned Classic Book Covers

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The 20 Most Iconic Book Covers Ever

The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald, 1925. Francis Cugat, a relatively unknown artist at the time, was commissioned to design the cover of the novel while Fitzgerald was still working on it — when Fitzgerald saw the cover, finished before the novel, he liked it so well that he told his publisher that he had “written it into” the book. Hemingway, on the other hand, hated it.

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Fictional Feasts: Mouth-Watering Moments of Literary Gastronomy

There are certain queer times and occasions in this strange mixed affair we call life when a man takes this whole universe for a vast practical joke, though the wit thereof he but dimly discerns, and more than suspects that the joke is at nobody's expense but his own. ― Herman Melville, Moby-Dick