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Why this pin? Because she makes life easier: IBM researcher Chieko Asakawa can’t see your website, but she can make it better. Many of the Web's wonders are still inaccessible to the visually impaired. Asakawa has done her best to change that through her work at the Tokyo branch of IBM Research, where she has devoted herself to improving blind people's access to computers and the Web for 27 years.

Forbesfrom Forbes

Inside Amazon's Idea Machine: How Bezos Decodes Customers

Why this pin? Because I like his style » Jeff Bezos, the founder, president, chief executive officer (CEO), and chairman of the board of Amazon.com: “There are two ways to extend a business. Take inventory of what you're good at and extend out from your skills. Or determine what your customers need and work backward, even if it requires learning new skills.” “There are two kinds of companies, those that work to try to charge more and those that work to charge less. We will be the second.”

Professor Dame Wendy Hall, the first female professor of engineering at the University of Southampton in Britain and the first dean at the university’s new faculty of Physical and Applied Sciences. She’s also only the second female computer scientist after Stephanie “Steve” Shirley to be made a Dame.

TapTapSee - Blind & Visually Impaired Camera ($0.00) designed to help the blind and visually impaired identify objects they encounter in their daily lives. Simply double tap the screen to take a photo of anything and hear the app speak the identification back to you. (Note: Spoken identification requires VoiceOver to be turned on)

This app will scan bar-codes and identify it for blind or visually impaired people. It also lets you create your own labels for anything you want.

2011 Women of Vision Award Winner for Social Impact, Karen Panetta, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tufts University, works to get more girls interested in STEM fields

Forbesfrom Forbes

Here's the Real Reason There Are Not More Women in Technology

Some inspiring women in technology

ViA - By Braille Institute ($0.00) Braille Institute is proud to introduce ViA (Visually Impaired Apps), a fully accessible app for iPod Touch, iPhone, and iPad. Designed to help identify apps that are useful for adults and children who are blind or have low vision, including those with additional disabilities. Users can easily sort through the 500,000+ apps in the App Store and locate those that were built specifically for, or provide functionality to, the user with a visual impairment.

EyeNote is a mobile device application to denominate Federal Reserve Notes (U.S. paper currency) as an aid for the blind or visually impaired to increase accessibility. Users can have the denomination of a note scanned and communicated back to the user.

Forbesfrom Forbes

Learning from a Google Veteran: Personal and Business Advice from Marissa Mayer

Why this pin? Because she's a talent. When Marissa Mayer joined Google, she became their first female engineer and 20th employee. When asked what Google will look like in 20 years, she reiterated Google’s mission to “organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.” Her mantra at Google seems to be understanding people – specifically, their identity and social context. “We can provide better services if we understand people’s context.”

Mobile Accessibility is two products in one: - It is a suite of 10 accessible applications (Phone, Contacts, SMS, Alarm, Calendar, Email, Web, Where am I, Apps and Settings) which have been especially designed for the blind and visually impaired. They all have a simplified interface whose textual information is spoken using Nuance Vocalizer® voice synthesis. - It is also a screen reader which allows you to get out of the suite and navigate the standard interface of your phone.

http://support.sas.com/misc/accessibility/ SAS accessibility gallery The SAS accessibility gallery contains prototypes of charts, graphs, and maps that are accessible to blind students and professionals. The prototypes have been optimized for access via the Safari web browser using the Voiceover screen reader on the Apple iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch.

Ubergizmofrom Ubergizmo

Munivo conceptual hand map helps the blind find their way around

Munivo conceptual hand map helps the blind find their way around | Ubergizmo