Two Women Under a Tree photo by Alice M. Boughton, ~ 1910

40 Must-See Photos From The Past | Bored Panda

Death photo...why in the world did they do this? http://blubabalu.blogspot.com/2011/06/strike-pose-postmortem-photography.html

On November 30, 1954, the Sylacauga meteorite became the first extraterrestrial object on record to strike a human being. The grapefruit-sized fragment crashed through the roof of Oak Hill, Alabama resident Ann Elizabeth Hodges house, bounced off a large wooden console radio, then deflected onto her while she napped on a couch. The 31-year-old woman was badly bruised on one side of her body, but able to walk. The event received worldwide publicity.

Questionable Momento Mori. In any case still a WTF photo....

the child on the left is definitely propped up by a stand but both girls hands are discolored and eyes look painted making me think both are deceased

Dead young woman. Note her hands. The frameworks fastened at the waist and neck with heavy gauge wire to position and hold the arms. The clothes were left unfastened at the back.

This picture is disgusting. If that woman was dead because of losing her head -- it was sick. I wonder if they had her head remove from the picture because she was a step-mother? The dad looks like he may be post-mortem. This picture was plain weird, no matter what the reasoning behind it was.

If you look closely you can see the wire holding up her arm. She is actually dead.

Pgeist173 - "The Other Sister"

Her picture taken after death, look closely you can see the stand holds her up. When a loved one died the Victorians were presented with an opportunity to imortalise their beloved in a way that was previously impossible: they could photograph them. Because of the high cost of photography, post-mortem photographs were, in many cases, the only photograph a family had of the deceased.

Victorian-Era Prostitutes. Just look at those bare legs. A scandal!

Weird. Woman with her dead child-with her eyes painted on. This was actually a common occurance.

A policeman patiently reasoning with a two-year-old boy trying to cross a street during a parade - 1958 Pulitzer Prize Winner

A 'hidden mother' photograph. In the Victorian Era, women holding infants were often covered because the photograph is meant to be cropped and framed to show only the infant.

A corpse sitting up on the slab due to the effects of rigor mortis - The Weird Picture Archive

A British sentry cuts a lonely picture as he stands at his post at sunrise in France, March 1915

Victorian women's boots