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Fantastic photo of a couple of Amazon River Dolphins, Inia geoffrensis: http://marinebio.org/species.asp?id=337 ~ see more photos at http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2347937/Heres-looking-chew-flipper-Rare-bubblegum-PINK-river-dolphin-makes-splash-Amazon.html

Aurelia aurita (also called the moon jelly, moon jellyfish, common jellyfish, or saucer jelly) is a widely studied species of the genus Aurelia

from Mail Online

Nipper the tiny flipper: Ten-day-old orphan dolphin is nursed back to health

Nipper; the tiny flipper.

from WebEcoist

Blushing Hides: 10 Amazing Pink Animals

pink dolphin {{Encantado}} is a word in Brazilian Portuguese that roughly translates as "enchanted one." The term is used for creatures who come from a paradiasical underwater realm called the Encante.

The Pink Dolphin lives in the Amazon Rainforest. It is usually found in the tributaries and main rivers of the Orinoco River systems in South America.

Snubfin Dolphin... in 2005 a new species of dolphin was found in Australian waters, the Australian snubfin dolphin. The discovery of a new mammal is extremely rare and scientists are now studying it to ensure it is not lost.

from Mail Online

Sharky the dolphin killed in mid-air collision at Brits' favourite theme park

Florida Dolphins | Fun and games: Dolphins love to play with each other but anacrobatic ...

from io9

An Uplifting Dolphin Story. Literally.

Dolphins and whales playing

Of the five freshwater species of dolphins in the world, the pink Amazon River dolphin, Inia geoffrensis, or "bufeo colorado” as they are known in Peru and “botos" as they known in in Brazil, are considered to be the most intelligent.

from BuzzFeed

35 Of The World's Rarest Animals

Vaquita. This is the world's smallest dolphin and is from the Northern Gulf of California and Mexico. There are less than 200 vaquita dolphins left in the wild and the population is declining. The immediate threat to the dolphins is the use of gill nets deployed by fishermen.

from Mail Online

Jumping for joy: The dolphins which don’t stop playing even when the sun goes down

Jumping for joy: Dolphins who don't stop playing even when the sun goes down | Mail Online

Rare Irrawaddy Dolphins in the freshwater regions of Bangladesh. These small Asian dolphins resemble Belugas.