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Community Post: Historic Photographs Of "White" Slaves

In 1863 and 1864, eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four children with mixed-race ancestry and pale complexions...
  • Roxanna Doxie-Weaver

    Rebecca, Augusta and Rosa. Slave Children from New Orleans. by George Eastman House, via Flickr

  • Carola

    In 1863 and 1864, eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four children with mixed-race ancestry and pale complexions were deliberately included to evoke sympathy from white northerners. Photographs of Charles Taylor, Rebecca Huger, Rosina Downs, and Augusta Broujey were mass-produced and sold as part of the campaign. Historic Photographs Of "White" Slaves

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Faces of emancipation: 1860 to 1880

*'White' slaves used for 1860s fundraiser propaganda Lighter skinned slave children of mixed race heritage were used as part of a fundraising campaign to help struggling African American schools in 1860s New Orleans. Campaign organizers believed the lighter complexioned children would help boost donations to their cause.

Rosa, Charley and Rebecca 1863, mixed race ancestry New Orleans.Historic Photographs Of "White" Slaves

Rebecca 1863...Rebecca had many different photos of her taken to raise money to help the black children of slavery

Fundraiser organizers used lighter skinned mixed race slave children as part of an campaign to raise money for African American schools in the 1860s. They believed that lighter skinned slaves would garner more sympathy, and in turn more money, for their cause.

"Rebecca, an Emancipated Slave, from New Orleans", 1863-64. In 1863 and 1864, eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four children with mixed-race ancestry and pale complexions were deliberately included to evoke sympathy from white northerners. Photographs of Charles Taylor, Rebecca Huger, Rosina Downs, and Augusta Broujey were mass-produced and sold as part of the campaign.

Rosa, Rebecca and Augusta 1863. Mixed race ancestry. Historic Photographs Of "White" Slaves

"Rosa, A Slave Girl from New Orleans", 1863-64. In 1863 and 1864, eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four children with mixed-race ancestry and pale complexions were deliberately included to evoke sympathy from white northerners. Photographs of Charles Taylor, Rebecca Huger, Rosina Downs, and Augusta Broujey were mass-produced and sold as part of the campaign.

"Freedom's Banner. Charley, A Slave Boy from New Orleans", 1863-64. In 1863 and 1864, eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four children with mixed-race ancestry and pale complexions were deliberately included to evoke sympathy from white northerners. Photographs of Charles Taylor, Rebecca Huger, Rosina Downs, and Augusta Broujey were mass-produced and sold as part of the campaign.

Historic Photographs Of White Slaves. In 1863 and 1864, eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four children with mixed-race ancestry and pale complexions were deliberately included to evoke sympathy from white northerners.

Rebecca, Charley and Rose 1863 mixed race ancestry. Historic Photographs Of "White" Slaves