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    The Black Drongo (Dicrurus macrocercus) is a wholly black bird with a distinctive forked tail. Feeding on insects, it is common in open agricultural areas and light forest throughout its range, perching conspicuously on a bare perch or along power or telephone lines. The species is famous for its aggressive behavior towards much larger birds, such as crows, never hesitating to dive-bomb any birds of prey that invade its territory. The informal name of King Crow is based on this behavior.

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    • Satish Nair

      The Black Drongo (Dicrurus macrocercus) is a wholly black bird with a distinctive forked tail. Feeding on insects, it is common in open agricultural areas and light forest throughout its range, perching conspicuously on a bare perch or along power or telephone lines. The species is famous for its aggressive behavior towards much larger birds, such as crows, never hesitating to dive-bomb any birds of prey that invade its territory. The informal name of King Crow is based on this behavior.

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    The Greater Racket-tailed Drongo, Dicrurus paradiseus, is distinctive in having elongated outer tail feathers with webbing restricted to the tips. They are conspicuous in the forest habitats often perching in the open and by attracting attention with a wide range of loud calls that include perfect imitations of many other birds. These drongos will sometimes steal insect prey caught or disturbed by other foragers in the flock. They are diurnal but are active well before dawn and late at dusk.

    Birds - Vogels

    Hooded Crows -

    Awesome!

    ~~Rufous-Backed Kingfisher (Ceyx rufidorsa) by Chong Lip Mun~~

    Rare piebald raven.

    Raven.

    Red-headed Vulture (Sarcogyps calvus), also known as the Asian King Vulture, Indian Black Vulture or Pondicherry Vulture was abundant, across the country. Today the range of the Red-headed Vulture is localized primarily to northern India. It is usually in open country and in cultivated and semi-desert areas. It is also found in deciduous forests and foothills and river valleys. It is usually found up to an altitude of 3000m from sea level.

    MESSENGER

    Indian Pitta (Pitta brachyura) The 20 cm Indian Pitta is a small bird which occurs in many parts of the country. Its brilliant colors light up the dark and wet forest understory in which it leads a shy existence. Pitta is derived from Telegu which means a small bird. The chirp of these birds can generally be heard in the morning and in the dusk. Because of the timing of their calls, these birds are also called as six-o-clock birds in Tamil.

    Spotted Owlet (Athene brama). A small squat, white-spotted (rather than barred) owlet with round head and yellow eyes. The birds in North India are paler grey-brown than the nominate race of South India. The call is a loud, harsh chiurr…chiurr…chiurr… followed with a cheevak cheevak. Often calls in unison. Well adapted to human establishments and often tolerant of human beings where it is not persecuted. Largely crepuscular and nocturnal. Feeds on insects, mice, lizards and small birds.

    Indian Scops Owl (Otus bakkamoena). A medium (smaller than the Collared) sized scops owl with large conspicuous ear-tufts. Has a distinct nuchal collar and also a second collar on nape. The male has a regular spaced what….what… call. Also a series of slowly repeated ackackackack…. on an ascending scale. Found from NW India east to West Bengal. Prefers well-wooded country. Seldom seen in daytime except at its roost. Feeds chiefly on nocturnal insects.

    Green Cochoa (Cochoa viridis): This Himalayan thrush is moss green, the male has a blue crown, blue wings and tail with a broad black band on the tail. The female has a more greenish body with some rusty spots on the wing coverts. Usually seen in pairs or small groups sitting in tall trees, they usually feed close to the ground, on molluscs, insects and berries. They sometimes launch aerial sallies to capture insects. The song is a thin and clear feeeee that dies away.

    Mrs. Gould's Sunbird (Aethopyga gouldiae) Ms. Gould was the wife of the famous British ornithologist and artist, John Gould and she helped to illustrate many of his well-known books on birds. This small and energetic 15cm nectar feeder inhabits out montane forests in the north and north-east of India. The female is short-tailed and inconspicuous in comparison to the flashy male. India has 12 species of sunbirds.

    Tawny Fish (Owl Ketupa flavipes). A large heavily dark-streaked, rich orange-rufous owl. It is distinguished from its cousin, the commoner Brown Fish Owl, by its larger size, its more orange upperparts and bolder black streaking. Found in the Himalayas where it prefers forests and hunts along streams, sometimes during the day. When disturbed, prefers to sit still and be watched rather than take flight. Feeds on fish and crabs. The call is a cat like mewing and a deep whoo-hoo.

    The Purple-rumped Sunbird (Leptocoma zeylonica) is a sunbird endemic to the Indian Subcontinent. Like other sunbirds, they are small in size, less than 10 cm long. feeding mainly on nectar but sometimes take insects, particularly when feeding young. They can hover for short durations but usually perch to feed. They build a hanging pouch nest made up of cobwebs, lichens and plant material. Males are brightly coloured but females are olive above and yellow to buff below.

    The Forest Owlet (Athene blewitti) is an owl that is endemic to the forests of central India remains critically endangered, and the current population has been estimated at less than 250. It is thought that this owl has always been rare. The original specimens were collected in dense jungle, and the recent sightings in more open forest may represent suboptimal habitat. The forest in the plains in its range has been totally cleared, and there is pressure on the remaining forest resources.

    Asian Barred Owlet (Glaucidium cuculoides). A small round-headed owlet, resembling Jungle Owlet, but larger. The two species may occur together in the lower foothills. Heavily and broadly barred on breast and flanks with streaking on lower flanks. Has a relatively long tail. The call is a bubbling wowowowowowowowow which gets deeper and louder. Undulating flight. Prefers hill forests. Largely diurnal often found sitting in the open in full sunlight. Feeds chiefly on large insects.

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