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  • CampGearBlogger

    Friday marks the 70th anniversary of the D-Day invasion where 160,000 Allied troops landed on the beaches of a German-occupied Normandy, France.

  • anna dresser

    I am a huge history buff and WWII is no exception. I've read pretty much everything there is on the storming of Normandy. Makes me tres proud that Canada played such an important role at Juno. The liberation of Europe from Nazi Germany came at a bloody price though.

  • Irene Coronado

    Dday June 6, 1944 a day America or the world will never forget

  • Corey Frey

    june 6 1944 d day invasion

  • Newsradio KXLY

    June 6, 1944, the D-Day invasion of Europe takes place during World War II as Allied forces stormed the beaches of Normandy, France.

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D Day at Normandy, France. No date or photo credit cited here. 6 June or the 7th, no matter. What a scene!

Beach during D-Day Invasion of Normandy

In the lead-up to D-Day (Operation Overlord), 1.5 million American men and women squeezed into southern England by early May. They had been training for months, including this practice run.

D-Day: The Normandy Invasion. Medics attend to wounded soldiers on Utah Beach in France during the Allied Invasion of Europe on D-Day, June 6, 1944. www.army.mil/...

Soldiers crowd a landing craft on their way to Normandy during the Allied Invasion of Europe. (Photo: US Army/Flickr)

Dwight D. Eisenhower. Supreme Commander of the Allied Invasion of Europe, primarily the Battles for Normandy, France and Germany World War II.

A U.S. Army soldier cleans his M1903 bolt-action rifle in a camp in England shortly before the Normandy invasion. Although the U.S. Army had adopted the semiautomatic M1 Garand rifle in 1937, a large number of M1903s were still being issued in 1944. Martin K. A. Morgan, author of The Americans on D-Day: A Photographic History of the Normandy Invasion, due out in a few weeks, explains why M1903s were still in use on D-Day.

World War II photo showing an American flag marking the way during the Normandy Invasion of France, 1944 – Photo taken by the 9th U.S. Army Air Corps, 6th TAC

US soldiers of the 1st Infantry Division in England just prior to the Normandy Invasion - June 1944. -