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  • Ryan Burgess

    My Favorite Civil War Piece of Art

  • Debbie Stidham

    The War Horse Memorial, Virginia Historical Society , Richmond, Va. - An inscription on the granite reads: 'In memory of the one and one half million horses and mules of the Confederate and Union armies who were killed, were wounded or died from disease in the Civil War.'

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7th Cavalry at Arlington to memorialize the Horses that were killed in the Civil War, 1860s

Hollywood Cemetary in Richmond VA. Civil war history

  • Angela Broadhuhn

    we have visited many times and always find something more interesting. Very beautiful and serene place full of history.

  • Nancy White

    So beautiful, yet so sad.

Women in the civil war were not allowed unless they were nurses. Four hundred women served in the war. Some historical records show that over sixty women were wounded or killed in the war.

The first Civil War casualty to be buried in Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn was a 12-year-old drummer for a New York regiment. Clarence McKenzie, a local boy fatally wounded in an accidental shooting in Maryland, was buried June 14, 1861, two months after the Union garrison at Fort Sumter surrendered to Confederate forces.

This photograph was taken in 1865 in Richmond Virginia. It shows a group of recently freed slaves, who became free with the fall of Richmond. It was on this date, December 6, in the year 1865 that the 13th amendment was ratified, banning slavery in the United States

War Horses who served our Country on both sides of the war and every other time in our Nation's history. ♥ God bless them all.

Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee & Traveller. Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee & Traveller Traveller was by far the most famous horse ridden during the Civil War. Gen. Lee's saddle & horse tack is on display at the Museum of the Confederacy Richmond VA.

Pryce Lewis was born in 1828 in Newton, Wales and emigrated to the United States in 1856. During the Civil War, he was employed by the Pinkerton Detective Agency and worked as a spy for the Union in Richmond, Va. He was captured and sentenced to be hanged but managed to escape death because of his British citizenship.

swiftsnowmane: War Horse 01 by *MeetMeAtTheLake2Nite “Nothing burns like the cold.” ― George R.R. Martin, A Game of Thrones

Virgina - Hollywood Cemetery - Civil War Cemetery in the state capital of Richmond. VA became the 10th state on June 25, 1788.

Civil War Icon....Tredegar Iron Works, circa 1837, in Richmond VA, photo by Tom Whitmore

Tredegar Iron Works was a historic iron works in Richmond, Virginia. Opened in 1837, by 1860 it was the third-largest iron manufacturer in the U.S. During the Civil War, it served as the primary iron and artillery production facility of the Confederate States of America.