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one day I hope to capture of photo of this little guy... Serval Cub Portrait (by TenPinPhil)

Servals (Leptailurus serval). African cats, closely related to the Caracal. They are nocturnal and solitary, very accurate when hunting rodents. There are two young kittens at the Columbus Zoo now. -K

magicalnaturetour: Serval accoglie i visitatori dello zoo di lobaev via redditpics :)

Serval (Leptailurus serval)

Serval Kitten - The name Serval is derived from a Portuguese word meaning "wolf-deer." The Servals are a small cat species that inhabits the jungles and the plains of Morocco, Algeria and South Africa and are bred domestically and raised as pets.

Known in Afrikaans as the Tierboskat, or tiger forest cat, the serval is a medium-sized feline most closely related to the caracal and the African golden cat.

Serval. This African wild cat lives on the savanna. Relative to its body size (2-3 feet,) it is the longest-legged cat in the world. It does not like to climb, but is a very fast runner and agile jumper. The population has been reduced due to killing it for its fur. Animal portrait by Wil Wardle.

Baby Serval. by LisaDiazPhotos** I'll bet this guy has no problem picking up AM radio in the sticks.

The serval, Leptailurus Serval, known in Afrikaans as Tierboskat, "tiger-forest-cat", is a medium-sized African wild cat. DNA studies have shown that the serval is closely related to the African golden cat and the Caracal. It is widely distributed South of the Sahara and was once also found in Morocco, Tunisia, and Algeria. White Serval are very rare, never having been found in the wild.

Whiskers by Johannes Wapelhorst Male Asian Golden Cat (Pardofelis temminckii)

The Serval (Leptailurus serval) has long legs for running and jumping, big ears for hearing (even animals underground) and are camouflaged at nighttime.

Africa | Serval cat that had run up a tree to get away from some lions. Serengeti, Tanzania | ©Charlie Summers