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Rogier Van der Weyden, Lady Wearing a Gauze Headdress  c. 1435  Oak  18 5/16 x 12 1/2 in. (47 x 32 cm)  Gemäldegalerie, Berlin

Rogier Van der Weyden, Lady Wearing a Gauze Headdress c. 1435 Oak 18 5/16 x 12 1/2 in. (47 x 32 cm) Gemäldegalerie, Berlin

http://i573.photobucket.com/albums/ss177/believe_my/Van-Eyck-tot-Drer.jpg?t=1288612335

http://i573.photobucket.com/albums/ss177/believe_my/Van-Eyck-tot-Drer.jpg?t=1288612335

Hemma von Gurk wearing the Order of the Swan by Swabian artist Sebald Bopp, c. 1490

Hemma von Gurk wearing the Order of the Swan by Swabian artist Sebald Bopp, c. 1490

Rogier van der Weydan woman

Burgundian V-necked Gowns: Yet another placket theory

Young woman, about 1460, Rogier van der Weyden, Washington, National Gallery

Young woman, about 1460, Rogier van der Weyden, Washington, National Gallery

Unknown Swabian artist. Portrait of a Woman of the Hofer Family
Date: about 1470, National Gallery London

Unknown Swabian artist. Portrait of a Woman of the Hofer Family Date: about 1470, National Gallery London

Married woman, 1435 // Robert Campin, Dutch Painter (1375-1444) National Gallery (London). Married women of the late medieval ages (and early Renaissance) was not supposed to show their hair in any way but cover it all up. This was to show that they were decent women, that they had no interest in tempting men and were good Christians.

Married woman, 1435 // Robert Campin, Dutch Painter (1375-1444) National Gallery (London). Married women of the late medieval ages (and early Renaissance) was not supposed to show their hair in any way but cover it all up. This was to show that they were decent women, that they had no interest in tempting men and were good Christians.

far I've found just a few exceptions to the "men only" rule. Both are rather longer (40 or 50 beads) t

far I've found just a few exceptions to the "men only" rule. Both are rather longer (40 or 50 beads) t