Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas

Safe drinking water is a privilege in North America.  Though essential to good health, it is often taken for granted.  It is delivered to our homes or offices for our enjoyment with little thought given to where it originated or how it got there.  We expect water to come forth as required.  We expect water to both look and taste good.  And we

io9from io9

Advertisments for scanning electron microscopes take you into the world of nano-monsters

micro

io9from io9

Advertisments for scanning electron microscopes take you into the world of nano-monsters

micro

io9from io9

Advertisments for scanning electron microscopes take you into the world of nano-monsters

micro

io9from io9

Advertisments for scanning electron microscopes take you into the world of nano-monsters

micro

Villi in the small intestine increase the surface area of the gut, which helps in the absorption of food. Look closely and you'll see some food stuck in one of the crevices.

mobile.twitter.comfrom mobile.twitter.com

A. Babilonia on

Real Image of T4 bacteriophage (a virus) via electron microscope. pic.twitter.com/bDZY93gjfG

Coloured scanning electron microscope (SEM) of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (yellow) on human nasal epithelial cells. These gram-positive cocci (spherical bacteria) are adhering to mucus (blue) on the hair-like cilia which protrude from the epithelial cells. S. aureus is very common in humans, living harmlessly on the skin and in the nose, throat and large intestine.

An electron microscope catches the immune system blooming into action. A white blood cell (red) wraps itself around a mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of most cases of tuberculosis. Phagocyte, as a white blood cell is known as, comes from the Greek word phagein (to eat), and that's what the cell does, rendering the infectious cell benign.

One of the ten finalists in the 2012 New Scientist Eureka Prize for Science Photography. This image, 'Another Day in the Life of Arabidopsis', shows a small, six-day-old seedling of Arabidopsis thaliana under a scanning electron microscope and captures the essence of seed germination, the tiny and delicate beginnings of a plant. The image has been artificially coloured to resemble the natural colours of the living seedling. Photo: Mark Talbot