E. coli--part of the normal flora of the human gut.  Certain strains of E. coli produce various toxins that cause illness

E. coli--part of the normal flora of the human gut. Certain strains of E. coli produce various toxins that cause illness

Mimivirus - the largest known virus, discovered in 1992, clocking on at a whopping 400 nanometers. (For perspective, there are 1 million nanometers in 1 millimeter)

Mimivirus - the largest known virus, discovered in 1992, clocking on at a whopping 400 nanometers. (For perspective, there are 1 million nanometers in 1 millimeter)

Staphylococcus sp. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a colony of Staphylococcus sp. bacteria on the epithelial cells of the trachea. The trachea (windpipe) is lined with cilia (hair- like projections) which help keep it free of dust and other irritants. These Gram-positive bacteria often appear in groups that resemble clusters of grapes (as here)

Staphylococcus sp. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a colony of Staphylococcus sp. bacteria on the epithelial cells of the trachea. The trachea (windpipe) is lined with cilia (hair- like projections) which help keep it free of dust and other irritants. These Gram-positive bacteria often appear in groups that resemble clusters of grapes (as here)

Looking uncannily like a collection of sushi, in fact this is a closeup of Smallpox viruses. The virus consists of genetic material (red), DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), enclosed by a protein capsid (coat, yellow)

Looking uncannily like a collection of sushi, in fact this is a closeup of Smallpox viruses. The virus consists of genetic material (red), DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), enclosed by a protein capsid (coat, yellow)

Migrating cancer cell. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a cultured cancer cell moving (metastasising) through a hole in a support film. Numerous pseudopodia (arm-like), fillipodia (thread-like) and surface blebs (lumps) can be seen. These features are characteristic of highly mobile cells, and enable cancerous cells to spread rapidly around the body, and invade other organs and tissues (metastasis).

Migrating cancer cell. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a cultured cancer cell moving (metastasising) through a hole in a support film. Numerous pseudopodia (arm-like), fillipodia (thread-like) and surface blebs (lumps) can be seen. These features are characteristic of highly mobile cells, and enable cancerous cells to spread rapidly around the body, and invade other organs and tissues (metastasis).

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