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‘During the Irish Civil War the National Army executed more Irishmen than the British had during the War of Independence.’ In the aftermath of the sudden death of Arthur Griffith and the killing of…

‘During the Irish Civil War the National Army executed more Irishmen than the British had during the War of Independence.’ In the aftermath of the sudden death of Arthur Griffith and the killing of…

The Second Dáil was Dáil Éireann as it convened from 16 August 1921 until 8 June 1922. From 19191922 Dáil Éireann was the revolutionary parliament of the self-proclaimed Irish Republic. The Second Dáil consisted of members elected in 1921. One of its most important acts was to bring an end to the War of Independence by ratifying the controversial Anglo-Irish Treaty. from the film "Michael Collins"

The Second Dáil was Dáil Éireann as it convened from 16 August 1921 until 8 June 1922. From 19191922 Dáil Éireann was the revolutionary parliament of the self-proclaimed Irish Republic. The Second Dáil consisted of members elected in 1921. One of its most important acts was to bring an end to the War of Independence by ratifying the controversial Anglo-Irish Treaty. from the film "Michael Collins"

The United Irishmen, 1798  A liberal political organisation in eighteenth century Ireland that sought Parliamentary reform. However, it evolved into a revolutionary republican organization, inspired by the American Revolution and allied with Revolutionary France. It launched the Irish Rebellion of 1798 with the objective of ending British monarchical rule over Ireland and founding an independent Irish republic.

The United Irishmen, 1798 A liberal political organisation in eighteenth century Ireland that sought Parliamentary reform. However, it evolved into a revolutionary republican organization, inspired by the American Revolution and allied with Revolutionary France. It launched the Irish Rebellion of 1798 with the objective of ending British monarchical rule over Ireland and founding an independent Irish republic.

The Liberty or Death flag was flown by the United Irishmen in the Battle of Arklow, in the Irish rebellion of 1798. Strategically, the battle was a success for the Irish; they had set up various points of entry around Arklow, from which they attacked the British, even disabling an artillery post. The failure came from improper leadership by the Irish, which led to defeat. Interestingly, the British were also on the verge of defeat, having only a few rounds of ammo per soldier remaining.

The Liberty or Death flag was flown by the United Irishmen in the Battle of Arklow, in the Irish rebellion of 1798. Strategically, the battle was a success for the Irish; they had set up various points of entry around Arklow, from which they attacked the British, even disabling an artillery post. The failure came from improper leadership by the Irish, which led to defeat. Interestingly, the British were also on the verge of defeat, having only a few rounds of ammo per soldier remaining.

Mary Moore - "For a few short days in May 1798, the fate of the Rebellion lay in the hands of Mary Moore as she sought shelter for Lord Edward Fitzgerald. Mary was born around 1775-6, in Dublin, to ironmonger James Moore and his wife, who owned the Yellow Lion Inn on Thomas Street. Mary and her father were both members of the United Irishmen."

Mary Moore - "For a few short days in May 1798, the fate of the Rebellion lay in the hands of Mary Moore as she sought shelter for Lord Edward Fitzgerald. Mary was born around 1775-6, in Dublin, to ironmonger James Moore and his wife, who owned the Yellow Lion Inn on Thomas Street. Mary and her father were both members of the United Irishmen."

During the American Civil War over 150,000 Irishmen, most were recent immigrants and were not yet American citizens; yet they joined the Union Army. Many hoped that such a display of patriotism would help put a stop to anti-Irish discrimination. The “Irish Brigade” were known for their courage, bravery and fortitude in battle.

During the American Civil War over 150,000 Irishmen, most were recent immigrants and were not yet American citizens; yet they joined the Union Army. Many hoped that such a display of patriotism would help put a stop to anti-Irish discrimination. The “Irish Brigade” were known for their courage, bravery and fortitude in battle.

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