Explore Steampunk Spiritualism, Occultism, and more!

Steampunk Spiritualism,Occultism,Paranormal

Katie King was the name given by Spiritualists in the 1870s to what they believed to be a materialized spirit. The question of whether the spirit was real or a fraud was a notable public controversy of the mid-1870s. The spirit was said to have appeared first in 1871 in séances conducted by Florence Cook in London, and later in 1874-1875 in New York in séances held by the mediums Jennie Holmes and her husband Nelson Holmes. Katie King was believed by Spiritualists to be the daughter of John…

Katie King was the name given by Spiritualists in the 1870s to what they believed to be a materialized spirit. The question of whether the spirit was real or a fraud was a notable public controversy of the mid-1870s. The spirit was said to have appeared first in 1871 in séances conducted by Florence Cook in London, and later in 1874-1875 in New York in séances held by the mediums Jennie Holmes and her husband Nelson Holmes. Katie King was believed by Spiritualists to be the daughter of John…

Steampunk Spiritualism,Occultism,Paranormal

Pamela Coleman Smith, who illustrated what we know as the Ryder-Waite tarot, but received no acknowledgement or payment.

Pamela Coleman Smith, who illustrated what we know as the Ryder-Waite tarot, but received no acknowledgement or payment.

Violet Mary Firth (1890-1946), aka "Dion Fortune", occultist, author, psychologist, teacher, artist, and mystic

Violet Mary Firth (1890-1946), aka "Dion Fortune", occultist, author, psychologist, teacher, artist, and mystic

Sometime in the 1860s, Photographer William Mumbler accidentally discovered how to do a double exposure.  The technique, easily duplicated now, was unheard of in those days and so Mumbler and a few other photographers like him, decided to jump onto the bandwagon of the Victorian obsession with the supernatural and offer spirit photography to the general gullible public.

Spooky Victorian Spirit Photography

Sometime in the 1860s, Photographer William Mumbler accidentally discovered how to do a double exposure. The technique, easily duplicated now, was unheard of in those days and so Mumbler and a few other photographers like him, decided to jump onto the bandwagon of the Victorian obsession with the supernatural and offer spirit photography to the general gullible public.

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