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Viking History (Denmark). 'The Vikings were not just plunderers but successful traders, extraordinary mariners and insatiable explorers. Getting a feel for the Viking era is easy, whether visiting the ship-burial ground of Ladby, the Viking forts of Zealand, the longship workshops at Roskilde or the museums that seek to re-create the era with live re-enactments.' http://www.lonelyplanet.com/denmark

Celtic Crosses ~ These crosses are found within a few miles of each other at Kilkieran, Kilree, Killamery and the finest examples at Ahenny, County Kilkenny.

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Celtic Cross (Graveyard of the Parish Church of St Materiana, Tintagel, Cornwall UK), by Zanthia, via Flickr

The Egtved Girl's grave. The Egtved Girl (c. 1390–1370 BCE) 16–18 yrs. blond, bronze bracelets, wool belt w. disc decorated w. spirals & spike. Buried with cremated child age 5–6; birchbark box w. awl, bronze pins, hair net. Flowering yarrow (summer burial) & a bucket of beer atop. Cord skirt outfit common in N. Europe in Bronze Age. Possible sacrifice.

Lindholm Høje (Lindholm Hills, from Old Norse haugr, hill or mound) is a major Viking burial site and former settlement situated to the north of and overlooking the city of Aalborg in Denmark.

Unesco World Heritage Site: Skogskyrkogården, The Woodland Cemetery, in Stockholm Sweden.

Necropolis - n. A burial place, especially a large and elaborate cemetery belonging to an ancient city. A.Word.A.Day (September 16, 2011)

Lewis Chessmen Knight: wears a protective coat, divided at the front and back for ease of movement. He carries a kite shaped shield and a lance ready for battle and sits on a horse which which looks like the size of a Shetland pony!

Boa Island and the Caldragh Cemetery Stone Figures. Boa is named after Babdb, Celtic goddess of Battles and frequently found in the company of (or disguise as) a crow. The strange monument is often described as a "Janus", referring to the two-faced Roman god. The statue is more than likely pre-Christian. The much smaller statue , equally enigmatic was "imported" from nearby Lusty Beg island - fittingly named the "Lusty Man".