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Wild Turkeys

Wild Turkeys, poors guys on this weekend. Run, turkeys, run!

From research we know at least 60 species of birds consume poison ivy berries. They are consumed so quickly that many people have been heard to remark, "I didn't even know poison ivy had berries!"

From research we know at least 60 species of birds consume poison ivy berries. They are consumed so quickly that many people have been heard to remark, "I didn't even know poison ivy had berries!

Tufted Titmouse by Birds & Blooms reader Lois Hobart

Though it can sometimes be a challenge, bird photography is a wonderful past time both shutterbugs and birding enthusiasts can enjoy. These bird photography tips are straight from the experts!

Blue Grosbeak by cometoseemerganser

Blue Grosbeak by cometoseemerganser

By helping birds, residents of cities and suburbs can contribute to conserving biodiversity.

By creating bird-friendly landscapes, residents of cities and suburbs can make a contribution to conserving biodiversity

A Barn Swallow finds some nesting material. Creative little guys and gals!

A Barn Swallow finds some nesting material. Creative little guys and gals!

Do you know your ecoregion? http://content.yardmap.org/explore/local-resources/

Do you know your ecoregion? http://content.yardmap.org/explore/local-resources/

While many hawks migrate with their food sources, urban hawks may find enough resources to sustain themselves through winter, giving them an advantage on nesting sites come spring. As urban populations expand, city birds are moving to the suburbs to raise a clutch. Brush piles, snags and other habitat features you can offer will provide resources for their growing populations. Visit www.Habitat.Network to find out about supporting and attracting local wildlife you'd like to see more of.

Urban hawks leave the city for the ’burbs

Predator mobbing is assumed to intimidate the would-be predator. This seems a logical theory as it usually results in the predator leaving the area. New research, however, says birds may be engaging in a sexual selection "show-off" by males.To read more about this research: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170222105242.htm.

Predator mobbing is assumed to intimidate the would-be predator. This seems a logical theory as it usually results in the predator leaving the area. New research, however, says birds may be engaging in a sexual selection "show-off" by males.To read more about this research: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170222105242.htm.
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