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Rune stone (U 448) at Harg. The inscription says: “Igul and Björn had the stone raised in memory of Torsten, their father”.

A rune stone is typically a raised stone with a runic inscription, but the term can also be applied to inscriptions on boulders and on bedrock. The tradition lasted from the 4th century into the 12th century, most dating from the late Viking Age. Most rune stones are found in Scandinavia, but also in locations visited by Norsemen during the Viking Age. Runestones are often memorials to deceased men.

picture stone by mararie, via Flickr

Rune Stone showing a sun wheel--two equinox and two solstice made for four arms making a cross. It also could represent the four winds and four directions. Later, it was seen as an Xian cross, the circle around it representing Christ's eternal glory, the 4 arms Christ's lordship over weather and directions--the whole universe. Rune stones were a Xian fashion that started in Denmark and spread to Xianized parts of Sweden.

A runestone is typically a raised stone with a runic inscription, but the term can also be applied to inscriptions on boulders and on bedrock. The tradition began in the 4th century, and it lasted into the 12th century, but most of the runestones date from the late Viking Age. Most runestones are located in Scandinavia, but there are also scattered runestones in locations that were visited by Norsemen during the Viking Age. Runestones are often memorials to deceased men. Runestones were usual...

Rune stone

Rune stone, Jursta, Södermanland, Sweden Rune stone (Sö 250) in Jursta. The inscription says: "Gynna raised this stone in memory of Saxe, Halvdan's son". Behind the rune stone is a farmstead.

Detail from an 11th century runic stone, Gamla Uppsala (Old Uppsala), Sweden. The inscription reads "Sigvid, the England traveller, erected this stone for Vidjärv, his father... The rest of the inscription is lost.

Viking rune stone, Upplands, Sweden - ca. 11th century. Rune stones began as a Christian tradition among Danish vikings, but spread and intensified in fashion in Sweden.