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Tuskegee Air Women, 1940s. Assigned as weather observers and forecasters, cryptographers, radio operators, repairmen, sheet metal workers, parachute riggers, link trainer instructors, bombsite maintenance specialists, aerial photograph analysts and control tower operators in the Air Corps.

Lee Andrew Archer, Jr. (September 6, 1919 – January 27, 2010) was a black U.S. fighter pilot in the African-American unit which became known as the Tuskegee Airmen. He was one of the first African-American military aviators in the United States Army Air Corps, the U.S. Army Air Forces and later the U.S. Air Force, eventually earning the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. During WW II, he flew 169 combat missions, and is officially credited with five enemy fighter aircrafts shot down.

Elisabeth Welch (1904-2003) the American singer who introduced the “Charleston” on Broadway before becoming a superstar in England, photographed by Carl Van Vechten on January 19, 1933. She was the first singer to popularize the classic Cole Porter tune, “Love for Sale” and it would become a signature song in her career. She also introduced “Stormy Weather” to British audiences and would be so beloved there, she remained for the rest of her life. Photo: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript…

women military ww2 | For a publicity photograph, the women of Company H, 2d Headquarters ...

The FIRST Black Senator; a RARE photograph and great portrait by Mathew Brady - a cabinet card photograph of Hiram Rhoades Revels (1822-1901). Of mixed African and Indian descent, he was a Methodist minister and later the first Black Senator (Mississippi) during Reconstruction, later the President of Alcorn University.

Jane Bolin was the first black woman judge in the United States. Born April 11, 1908 in Poughkeepsie, New York, Bolin always knew she wanted to be a lawyer. Her father, Gaius Bolin, the first African American graduate of Williams College, practiced law in Poughkeepsie. Bolin graduated from Wellesley College in 1928, and received her law degree from Yale University School of Law in 1931.

The Kalash Tribe, Hindukush Mountains, Pakistan. They are the direct descendants of Alexander The Great's Army. They are Pagan, and there are approximately 3000 remaining and have no written language. Once you leave the tribe, you cannot return to live with them. The mountains are difficult to reach as it is weather dependent.

Noor Inayat Khan / Nora Baker, (Urdu: نور عنایت خان ) GC, MBE was an Allied heroine of the Second World War. Usually known as Noor Inayat Khan, she was of Indian Sufi origin. As a British Special Operations Executive agent during the Second World War, she became the first female radio operator to be sent into occupied France to aid the French Resistance.

Animal espionage... From 1908, pigeons were fitted with cameras to take aerial photos. Photograph: Boyer / Roger Viollet / Getty images. ☀

Clark Gable (1901-1960) Major US Army Air Corps 1942-44 WW II. Although beyond draft age, Clark Gable enlisted as a private. Assigned to OCS he excelled and received a commission. He flew five combat mission as an observer/gunner in a B-17earning a Distinguished Flying Cross and an Air Medal. On his fourth mission, a 20mm shell cut the heel from his boot. His discharge was signed by Captain Ronald Reagan. Gable starred in 67 movie films.

A navy photographer snapped this photograph of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii on December 7, 1941, just as the USS Shaw exploded.

Pioneering Black female lawyer Charlotte E. Ray achieved her historic feat 1872, becoming just the third woman ever admitted to practice law in the country at the time. Ray was also the first woman admitted to practice law in the nation’s capital and the first woman to argue a case in front of the Supreme Court.

The word “front-line girl” (frontovichka) became a terrible insult, synonimous to “whore”. Hundreds thousand of girls who went to war to protect their homeland with their very lives, who came back injured or disabled, with medals for valor, had to hide it to protect themselves from public scorn.

Last Lakota code talker Clarence Wolf Guts dies at 86. When the towers of the World Trade Center fell on Sept. 11, 2001, Clarence Wolf Guts asked his son to call the U.S. Dept. of Defense to see if the country needed his code talking abilities to find Osama Bin Laden. Wolf Guts was in his late 70s at the time, so his son, Don Doyle, did not make the call, but said the request personified his father's love of country. "He still wanted to help. He was trying to still be patriotic." ~Doyle.. <3

Oft forgotten heroines on WW2 -Lumberjills of The Women's Timber Corps. Like the many other amazing heroines of their time, the ladies of the Women’s Timber Corps stepped into unconventional britches in order to keep the industry, and country, moving while the men were off at war.

A Japanese soldier, Yasuno Chikao, prepares to behead Australian Sergeant Leonard G. Siffleet at Aitape in New Guinea. The Australian commando from "M" Special Unit was captured while his small patrol was operating deep behind enemy lines. 1943. The photograph was discovered on the body of a dead Japanese major near Hollandia by American troops in April 1944.