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Tuskegee Air Women, 1940s. Assigned as weather observers and forecasters, cryptographers, radio operators, repairmen, sheet metal workers, parachute riggers, link trainer instructors, bombsite maintenance specialists, aerial photograph analysts and control tower operators in the Air Corps.

Lee Andrew Archer, Jr. (September 6, 1919 – January 27, 2010) was a black U.S. fighter pilot in the African-American unit which became known as the Tuskegee Airmen. He was one of the first African-American military aviators in the United States Army Air Corps, the U.S. Army Air Forces and later the U.S. Air Force, eventually earning the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. During WW II, he flew 169 combat missions, and is officially credited with five enemy fighter aircrafts shot down.

Elisabeth Welch (1904-2003) the American singer who introduced the “Charleston” on Broadway before becoming a superstar in England, photographed by Carl Van Vechten on January 19, 1933. She was the first singer to popularize the classic Cole Porter tune, “Love for Sale” and it would become a signature song in her career. She also introduced “Stormy Weather” to British audiences and would be so beloved there, she remained for the rest of her life. Photo: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript…

women military ww2 | For a publicity photograph, the women of Company H, 2d Headquarters ...

Jane Bolin was the first black woman judge in the United States. Born April 11, 1908 in Poughkeepsie, New York, Bolin always knew she wanted to be a lawyer. Her father, Gaius Bolin, the first African American graduate of Williams College, practiced law in Poughkeepsie. Bolin graduated from Wellesley College in 1928, and received her law degree from Yale University School of Law in 1931.

The FIRST Black Senator; a RARE photograph and great portrait by Mathew Brady - a cabinet card photograph of Hiram Rhoades Revels (1822-1901). Of mixed African and Indian descent, he was a Methodist minister and later the first Black Senator (Mississippi) during Reconstruction, later the President of Alcorn University.

The Kalash Tribe, Hindukush Mountains, Pakistan. They are the direct descendants of Alexander The Great's Army. They are Pagan, and there are approximately 3000 remaining and have no written language. Once you leave the tribe, you cannot return to live with them. The mountains are difficult to reach as it is weather dependent.

Amy Johnson was the first female pilot to fly alone from Britain to Australia, which she achieved at the age of 26. Her flying career began in 1928 and other triumphs included becoming the first female ground engineer licensed by the Air Ministry, and being awarded the C.B.E. for her flying achievements.

Badasses: "Two United States Army nurses carry heavy combat packs on a eight-mile hike through the jungle as part of their training before taking up front-line war assignments. Before reporting for duty the American nurses learn how to combat jungle hazards and how to care both for themselves and their patients under all conditions."

In Soviet Union women participating in WWII were erased from history, remaining as the occasional anecdote of a female sniper or simply as medical staff or, at best, radio specialists. The word “front-line girl” (frontovichka) became a terrible insult, synonimous to “whore”. Hundreds thousand of girls who went to war to protect their homeland with their very lives, who came back injured or disabled, with medals for valor, had to hide it to protect themselves from public scorn.

El Fondren, 106 years old, celebrating his first successful attempt to register to vote in Mississippi in 1966. Photograph taken by Bob Fitch, a white photojournalist who gained fame for his work on the Civil Rights Movement.

Famous photograph of Henry Longabaugh (the Sundance Kid) and the mysterious Etta Place. No one knows where she came from or what happened to her after she left Butch Cassidy and Sundance in Argentina in 1905.

Clark Gable (1901-1960) Major US Army Air Corps 1942-44 WW II. Although beyond draft age, Clark Gable enlisted as a private. Assigned to OCS he excelled and received a commission. He flew five combat mission as an observer/gunner in a B-17earning a Distinguished Flying Cross and an Air Medal. On his fourth mission, a 20mm shell cut the heel from his boot. His discharge was signed by Captain Ronald Reagan. Gable starred in 67 movie films.

Warsaw, Poland, Jews in a ghetto street. One of the photographs taken by the German photographer Willi George over the course of a single day in the summer of 1941. The photographs are unique in that they were not staged, but showed the ghetto as it truly was.

Pioneering Black female lawyer Charlotte E. Ray achieved her historic feat 1872, becoming just the third woman ever admitted to practice law in the country at the time. Ray was also the first woman admitted to practice law in the nation’s capital and the first woman to argue a case in front of the Supreme Court.

When slaves were captured, their hair was cut off, in order to begin the process of eradicating their sense of culture and identity. They were then given head-wraps to use protect against harsh weather and the spread of head lice. Originally, these head-wraps were given to both sexes but later were used exclusively by women. In some places in the South, women were required by law to secure their hair in these wraps.