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Previous pinner: "They might not look like it, but warthogs can run up to 34 miles per hour. Not too shabby!"

Warthog

Previous pinner: "They might not look like it, but warthogs can run up to 34 miles per hour. Not too shabby!

The impala’s social organization allows it to adapt to environmental conditions. When food is plentiful, males become territorial, shepherding females about their land. In dry periods, territories are abandoned as herds must travel farther to find food.

The impala’s social organization allows it to adapt to environmental conditions. When food is plentiful, males become territorial, shepherding females about their land. In dry periods, territories are abandoned as herds must travel farther to find food.

By A Natureza E Os Animais.

Mother & Child - The Black-Faced Impala (Aepyceros petersi) is listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature) There are only 2 to 3 thousand in the wild.

Nature photographer Don Quintana notes that he likes to go to California's San Luis National Wildlife Refuge to check out the tule elk.

Bears with teddy bears. It never gets old.

Funny pictures about Baby polar bear vs. Oh, and cool pics about Baby polar bear vs. Also, Baby polar bear vs.

Running Springbok jumping high by Johan Swanepoel

Running Springbok jumping high by Johan Swanepoel

The sitatunga is Africa’s only  true amphibious antelope

Sitatunga

Sitatungas are easily caught by setting snares in their well-traveled paths in swamps. Because of this, overhunting outside protected areas is causing a rapid decline in their numbers.

The first moments of life by José Eugenio Fernández Torés Females and young form herds of up to 200 individuals. When food is plentiful, adult males will establish territories. Females pass through the territories with the best food resources.  Territorial males round up any female herds that enter their grounds, and will chase away bachelor males that follow. They will even chase away recently weaned males. A male impala tries to prevent any female from leaving his territory.

earthandanimals: The first moments of life Photo by José Eugenio Fernández Torés

Gerenuks

Gerenuks

Ox Pecker with Impala Photo by B. Colin -- National Geographic Your Shot-- guess what time it is

This photograph of an impala with oxpecker was submitted to the Readers Wildlife Photo Gallery by Bruce Colin.

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