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Like dust bunnies that lurk in corners and under beds, surprisingly complex loops and blobs of cosmic dust lie hidden in the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 1316. This image made from data obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope reveals the dust lanes and star clusters of this giant galaxy that give evidence that it was formed from a past merger of two gas-rich galaxies.

Extreme star cluster bursts into life ~ Credit: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage (STScVAURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration ~

Star Cluster- Hubble Telescope Image

This Hubble Space Telescope view shows one of the most dynamic and intricately detailed star-forming regions in space, located 210,000 light-years away in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way. At the centre of the region is a brilliant star cluster called NGC 346. A dramatic structure of arched, ragged filaments with a distinct ridge surrounds the cluster.

Seven Sisters , pleiades Star Cluster. Thanks, Ginny, for bringing Seven Sisters into my here and now-

Pleiades Deep Field. Also known as the Seven Sisters and M45, the Pleiades lies about 400 light years away toward the constellation of the Bull (Taurus).

APOD: Pleiades Deep Field Image Credit & Copyright: Stanislav Volskiy Explanation: Have you ever seen the Pleiades star cluster? Even if you have, you probably have never seen it like this: all dusty. Perhaps the most famous star cluster on the sky, the bright stars of the Pleiades can be seen without binoculars from even the depths of a light-polluted city.

An astronomical trip from the California Nebula to the Pleiades star cluster would cover just over 12 degrees across planet Earth's night sky. That's equivalent to the angular extent of 25 Full Moons, as your telescope sweeps past the borders of the constellations Perseus and Taurus.

The Pleiades star cluster (M45) is a group of 800 stars formed about 100 million years ago. The cluster is located 410 light-years away from Earth in the constellation Taurus.

This cosmic vista stretches 20 degrees across constellation Taurus. It begins at the Pleiades and ends at the Hyades, two of the best known star clusters in planet Earth's sky. On top, the lovely Pleiades star cluster is about 400 light-years away. In a familiar celestial scene, the cluster stars shine through dusty clouds that scatter blue starlight. At bottom, Hyades cluster looks more spread out compared to the compact Pleiades and lies much closer, 150 light-years distant. Beautiful! (NASA)

#Pleiades #M45 #Cluster. High resolution (1920x1080) wallpaper of this image available at www.mindblowingpi...