Sister Anna White (1831 - 1910, Mount Lebanon, NY) believed that the Shakers’ religious views had social and political implications that could not be ignored. She advocated as a member of the National American Woman Suffrage Association and worked on the National Council of Women. The most high-profile social work she was involved in was the peace and disarmament movement in 1905. Read more of Anna's story at www.shakerml.org/exhibitions Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon

Shaker Rocking Chair, Mount Lebanon, NY

Ann Lee (1736 - 1784) Read her story at www.shakerml.org/exhibitions - Map: Drawn by Ross P. Teller in 1952. He was employed at the time at the Shaker Village Work Group at the South Family at Mount Lebanon. Shaker Museum|Mount Lebanon Collection, 11236. - Celebrating National Women's History Month: A Shaker Sketchbook at Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon

SHAKER MUSEUM | MOUNT LEBANON l ABOUT

Ellen "Helen" Park (1884 - 1956) was a young woman at the North Family of Mount Lebanon. She left in 1905, but two Shaker Sisters she met there remained her life-long friends. To read more of Helen's story visit www.shakerml.org/exhibitions. "Celebrating National Women's History Month" Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon

Ellen "Helen" Park (1884 - 1956) was brought to the Shakers when she was 17, but left a few years later. However a friendship she made with two Shaker Sisters lasted a lifetime. To read more of Helen's story visit www.shakerml.org/exhibitions "Celebrating National Women's History Month" Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon

Sister Emma Jane Neale (1847-1943, Mount Lebanon) developed a cloak business that served as an example of genuine, honest Shaker products highly valued in the early 20th century. In doing so, she established the Mount Lebanon Shakers as key figures in the 20th century economy not just as consumers, but producers. Read Sister Emma's story at www.shakerml.org/exhibitions. "Celebrating National Women's History Month: A Shaker Sketchbook" Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon

shaker

Ellen "Helen" Park (1884 - 1956) came to the Shakers when she was seventeen and left just four years later. However the two Shaker Sisters she met there Lydia and Flora Staples would be her life-long friends. Read Helen's story at www.shakerml.org/exhibitions. "Celebrating National Women's History Month: A Shaker Sketchbook" Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon

Rebecca Jackson (1795 - 1871) a black uneducated married woman, became a visionary in the Shaker Church and with her disciple Rebecca Perot (seen here) established the only urban Shaker community in Philadelphia, PA which was also the only predominantly black community in Shaker history. Read more about her story, Rebecca Perot and the Philadelphia Shakers at www.shakerml.org/exhibitions. "Celebrating National Women's History Month: A Shaker Sketchbook" Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon

Shaker Museum|Mount Lebanon Collection New Lebanon, NY

Sister Margaret Egleston (1843-1925, Mount Lebanon, NY). On December 28, 1923, a fire broke out in the Second Family that threatened not only the chair factory, but half a dozen Shaker workshops and buildings. Seventy-five year old Eldress Margaret jumped to action organizing the Shaker sisters in a bucket-brigade hauling buckets of water up to the roofs of the burning buildings. Read about Margaret's story at www.shakerml.org/exhibitions Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon

Sister Jennie Wells (1878 - 1956) came to Shakers when she was four years old. Over the nearly seventy five years she spent with the Shakers she moved over half a dozen times. Sister Jennie lived through the rapid decline of Shaker villages across the country. Read her story and the story of those villages at www.shakerml.org/exhibitions "Celebrating National Women's History Month: A Shaker Sketchbook" Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon

Dolly Sexton (1776 - 1884). Sister Dolly, (seated right) became one of the longest-lived Shakers in history, dying only five days shy of her 108th birthday. Read Sister Dolly's story at www.shakerml.org/exhibitions. "Celebrating National Women's History Month: A Shaker Sketchbook" Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon

SHAKER MUSEUM | MOUNT LEBANON l COLLECTIONS

Sister Carrie Wade (1872-1924, Mount Lebanon, NY) left the Shakers to marry Hugh Gallagher, a hired man at the village. He stayed on as a hired-man and Carrie remained close with the Shaker Sisters. She became a member of the Committee of Nursing Service and reportedly helped the Shakers maintain their infirmary. Carrie and Hugh Gallagher lived at the Ann Lee Cottage at Mount Lebanon with the Shakers for over fifteen years. Read more of Carrie's story at www.shakerml.org/exhibitions

A Shaker Brother and his feathered pets | Mt. Lebanon Shaker Village, NY | Harvard Art Museums @Ashley Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon

Shakers' Oval Boxes, Mount Lebanon, NY and Canterbury, NH, ca. 1840 The Shakers came to America from England in 1774 with four important religious tenets: celibacy, self-sufficiency, confession of sins and communal living. That first one meant that they went from having 5,000 followers to just a handful now.

New Lebanon, Shaker Candle stand [American] ca 1800-40. The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Shaker green painted basket, New Lebanon NY c.1830

Bookmark E. J. Neale and Company- ca. 1910 Geography: Mid-Atlantic, Mount Lebanon, New York, United States Culture: American