Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas

Explore Runes In Wales, Roman Amphitheatre, and more!

Ogham (᚛ᚑᚌᚐᚋ᚜) is an alphabet that appears on monumental inscriptions dating from the 4th to the 6th century AD, and in manuscripts dating from the 6th to the 9th century. It was used mainly to write Primitive and Old Irish, and also to write Old Welsh, Pictish and Latin. It was inscribed on stone monuments throughout Ireland, particuarly Kerry, Cork and Waterford, and in England, Scotland, the Isle of Man and Wales, particularly in Pembrokeshire in south Wales. (...)

Awen. Awen is a Welsh word for "(poetic) inspiration". In some forms of Neo-druidry the term is symbolized by an emblem showing three straight lines that spread apart as they move downward, drawn within a circle or a series of circles of varying thickness, often with a dot, or point, atop each line.

'The Awen' - Celtic/Druidic symbol in the center of the triple moon and sun. Awen is a Welsh word for "(poetic) inspiration". In the Welsh tradition, Awen is the inspiration of the poet bards; or, in its personification, Awen is the inspirational muse of creative artists in general: the inspired individual (often, but not limited to being, a a poet or a soothsayer) is described as an awenydd.

Ever wanted to know how Irish people wrote before they adopted the Roman Alphabet? This is the 'Ogham Alphabet' and its how the pre-Irish used to write. This book, the "Book of Ballymote", dates to at least 1st Century BC.

Ogham is an alphabet that appears on inscriptions from the 4th to 6th centuries CE and in manuscripts from the 6th to 9th century, used to write Primitive and Old Irish, Old Welsh, Pictish and Latin, esp on stone monuments in Ireland, Kerry, Cork and Waterford, and in England, Scotland and Wales, perhaps named after the Irish god Ogma, or after the Irish phrase og-úaim (point-seam), which refers to the seam made by the point of a sharp weapon.

Northern Ireland - Said to be the earliest datable Christian monument in Ireland. This carved Standing Stone at Kilnasaggart is inscribed to Ternohc who according to the Irish Annals died in 714AD.