Explore Little Bighorn, Custer 1839 1876, and more!

Captain Thomas French, Seventh Cavalry

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument preserves the site of the June 25 and 26, 1876, Battle of the Little Bighorn, near Crow Agency, Montana.

Sitting Bull was a Hunkpapa Lakota chief and holy man. He is notable in U.S. & Native American history for his victory at the Battle of the Little Bighorn against Custer’s 7th Cavalry, where his premonition of defeating them became reality. His name is synonymous with Native American culture, and he's considered one of the most famous Native Americans in history.

Chief Shot-in-the-eye, 1899. "Shot-in-the-Eye was an Oglala Sioux who fought in the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876, where he was wounded and lost an eye. What he was called prior to this battle is unknown.

Haunted Battlefields: The Ghosts of the Battle of the Little Bighorn History knows it as Custer's Last Stand. It was more like Sitting Bull...

The Battle of the Little Bighorn, also known as Custer's Last Stand and, by the Indians involved, as the Battle of the Greasy Grass, was an armed engagement between combined forces of Lakota, Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho people against the 7th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army. The battle, which occurred on June 25 and 26, 1876 near the Little Bighorn River in eastern Montana Territory, was the most famous action of the Great Sioux War of 1876.

Little Bighorn Battlefield, near Crow Agency, Montana, USA

Stump Horn holds a carbine he captured at the Battle of the Little Bighorn

Crazy Horse photos - Google Search

"Iron Hawk", also known as Amos Little, was a Hunkpapa Sioux. He born in Montana in 1862 & died after May 13, 1907, when he gave an interview with Eli S. Richter "Iron Hawk's Story of the Battle, #1 A Hunkpapa Sioux's account of the Battle of the Little Bighorn".

Brig. Gen. E.S. Godfrey (7th Cavalry, survivor of the Battle of Little Bighorn) at the 50th Anniversary of this battle, standing next to a Sioux Warrior in traditional dress, both in front of a newly placed engraved cross... (On the same photo, this Indian was also identified as White Man Runs Him, Custer's Crow scout !?!) - Photographer unidentified. - 1926 - (B/W copy)

Little Bighorn Battlefield... Montana

Crow King: For the duration of the battle of Little Bighorn, Crow King and his band of eighty warriors attacked Custer from the south, allowing Crazy Horse and Gall to surround the 7th Cavalry. Crow King died in 4-5-1884, cause of death - "quick consumption" from a long lasting cold and received the rites and sacraments of the Catholic church. Location of his burial is unknown. Source: Wikipedia

Little Big Man was at Battle of Little Bighorn , was an armed engagement between combined forces of Lakota, Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes, against the 7th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army. on June 25 and 26, 1876 Crazy Horse and Chief Gall,Sitting Bull (Tȟatȟáŋka Íyotake)Custer was killed, as were two of his brothers, a nephew, and a brother-in-law.

Little Big Horn photo by Stanley Morrow 1879 -- courtesy Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, Montana, USA: Just south of Billings, Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer and his troops made their last stand. Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument features the Plains Indians and United States military involved in the historic battle. (Photo Credit: Connie Ricca/CORBIS)

Little Bighorn Battlefield- Custer's Last Stand. If possible, make sure to take time for the interpretive ranger talk before walking around the monmument fields. It puts everything in a deeper perspective.

On distant fields lie our slain, barren bone; loved young men, now taken, unsung and alone . . .Little Bighorn Battlefied, Montana

On June 25 1876, George Armstrong Custer and the 7th Cavalry attempted to attack a united force of Sioux and Cheyenne Indians. Custer underestimated the opposing side's size and skill, and the 7th Cavalry was wiped out at the Battle of the Little Big Horn.