There’s more to see...
Come take a look at what else is here!
Visit Site
  • Carolynn S. Williams

    House of God Ostracon:- This Ostracon (writing on pottery) was discovered in Arad, an ancient Judean administrative center. Written in ancient Hebrew script dated to the early 6th century BCE, it is presumed to be one of the earliest epigraphic references to the Temple in Jerusalem.A portion of the inscription reads: "To my lord Elyashib,may the Lord seek your welfare and as to the matter which you command me it is well,he is in the House of God"

Related Pins

Ketef Hinnom Amulets:Two tiny silver scrolls in the form of amulets were discovered at a burial cave at Ketef Hinnom. Written in ancient Hebrew script dated to the 7th century BCE, the scrolls comprise the earliest-known fragments of a biblical text and pre-date the earliest scrolls from Qumran by more than 300 years.A form of what is known as the priestly blessing is contained in the scroll.It also contains the oldest known form of the Divine Name of God(Known as the Tetragrammatom)

Period: Neo-Assyrian Date: ca. 8th century B.C. Geography: Mesopotamia, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu, IRAQ) Culture: Assyrian 1958, excavated by Sir Max Mallowan on behalf of the British School of Archaeology in Iraq and the Metropolitan Museum of Art; ceded to the British School of Archaeology in Iraq in the division of finds; acquired by the Museum in 1959, purchased from British School of Archaeology in Iraq

Dancer Horvat Qitmit Iron Age II, late 7th - early 6th century BCE Pottery H: 17.5 cm Israel Antiquities Authority

Hazael King of Syria - Biblical Archaeology from Ancient Damascus (Bible History Online)

Pool of Siloam Revealed. Ancient Bible Discoveries l Archaeology Artifacts

Borsippa was an important ancient city of Sumer, built on both sides of a lake about 17.7 km (11.0 mi) southwest of Babylon on the east bank of the Euphrates. The site of Borsippa is in Babylon Province, Iraq and now called Birs Nimrud, identifying the site with Nimrod. The ziggurat, the "Tongue Tower," today one of the most vividly identifiable surviving ziggurats, is identified in the Talmud and Arab culture with the Tower of Babel.

This ancient clay tablet is dated to the 14th-13th century BCE, and on it is inscribed a map of the countryside around the Mesopotamian city of Nippur, located in the middle of the southern Mesopotamia floodplain, near the modern city of Diwaniyah. The inscription on the tablet is in cuneiform.

A particularly interesting artifact from the Solomon Temple reign of King Uzziah of Judah, c. 750 BC, is a small ivory pomegranate - vase shaped with a long neck and petals. Around its shoulder, in an early Hebrew script, is inscribed "Sacred donation for the priests of the House of the Lord ". Like the Temple Ostracon and the David Tablet, this item is also held at the Israel Museum.

"Now Hazael king of Aram had oppressed Israel all the days of Jehoahaz. But the Lord was gracious to them and had compassion on them because of His covenant with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and would not destroy them or cast them from His presence until now." For the sake of His covenant, God was willing to spare the apostate Northern Kingdom for a period of time

Biblical archaeology - An ossuary bearing the name "Yehochanan" contained the full skeleton of a man crucified in the first century and buried with a bent crucifixion nail through his heel bone. It is the only physical evidence of crucifixion ever discovered.

Archaeology confirms the historical references made in the Bible of a Roman Governor named Pontius Pilate, the procurator who ordered Jesus’ crucifixion. In June 1961 Italian archaeologists led by Dr. Frova were excavating near Caesarea and uncovered a limestone block. On the face is an inscription, which is part of a larger dedication to Tiberius Caesar and clearly says, “Pontius Pilate, Prefect of Judea.” This is the only known occurrence of the name Pontius Pilate in any ancient inscription.