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The Eye (Russian: Соглядатай, Sogliadatai), written in 1930, is Vladimir Nabokov's fourth novel. It was translated into English by the author's son Dmitri Nabokov in 1965. At just over 100 pages, The Eye is Nabokov's shortest novel. As in many of Nabokov's early works, the characters are largely Russian émigrés relocated to Europe, specifically Berlin. In this case the novel is set in two houses where a young Russian tutor, Smurov, is renting room and board.

The Eye (Russian: Соглядатай, Sogliadatai), written in 1930, is Vladimir Nabokov's fourth novel. It was translated into English by the author's son Dmitri Nabokov in 1965. At just over 100 pages, The Eye is Nabokov's shortest novel. As in many of Nabokov's early works, the characters are largely Russian émigrés relocated to Europe, specifically Berlin. In this case the novel is set in two houses where a young Russian tutor, Smurov, is renting room and board.

"I don't think in any language. I think in images. I don't believe that people think in languages. They don't move their lips when they think. It is only a certain type of illiterate person who moves his lips as he reads or ruminates. No, I think in images, and now and then a Russian phrase or an English phrase will form with the foam of the brainwave, but that’s about all." Vladimir Nabokov

"I don't think in any language. I think in images. I don't believe that people think in languages. They don't move their lips when they think. It is only a certain type of illiterate person who moves his lips as he reads or ruminates. No, I think in images, and now and then a Russian phrase or an English phrase will form with the foam of the brainwave, but that’s about all." Vladimir Nabokov

The Russian-born author Vladimir Nabokov in his suite at the Montreux Palace hotel in Switzerland, where he lived from 1961 until his death in 1977.

The Russian-born author Vladimir Nabokov in his suite at the Montreux Palace hotel in Switzerland, where he lived from 1961 until his death in 1977.

....and disclose the beauty of a unity to which you have contributed something of your own blood.” ― Vladimir Nabokov, Lectures on Russian Literature

....and disclose the beauty of a unity to which you have contributed something of your own blood.” ― Vladimir Nabokov, Lectures on Russian Literature

The Nabakovs At Work  Russian-born American author Vladimir Nabokov (1899 - 1977) dictates from notecards while his wife Vera (nee Slonim, 1902 - 1991 types on a manual typewriter, Ithaca, New York, Sepember, 16 1958.

The Nabakovs At Work Russian-born American author Vladimir Nabokov (1899 - 1977) dictates from notecards while his wife Vera (nee Slonim, 1902 - 1991 types on a manual typewriter, Ithaca, New York, Sepember, 16 1958.

The Real Lolita - Sally Horner in a photo believed to have been taken in Atlantic City in 1948. The story of 11-year-old Sally Horner’s abduction changed the course of 20th-century literature. She just never got to tell it herself.

The Real Lolita - Sally Horner in a photo believed to have been taken in Atlantic City in 1948. The story of 11-year-old Sally Horner’s abduction changed the course of 20th-century literature. She just never got to tell it herself.

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