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Sifting through Dust near Orion's Belt

A new image of the region surrounding the reflection nebula Messier 78, just to the north of Orion’s Belt, shows clouds of cosmic dust threaded through the nebula like a string of pearls. The observations, made with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope[1], use the heat glow of interste...
  • Lisa Brushy

    This image of the region surrounding the reflection nebula Messier 78, just to the north of Orion’s belt, shows clouds of cosmic dust threaded through the nebula like a string of pearls. The submillimetre-wavelength observations, made with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope and shown here in orange, use the heat glow of interstellar dust grains to show astronomers where new stars are being formed. They are overlaid on a view of the region in visible light. Image: ESO/APEX

  • ProCycling WorldTour

    Cosmic dust clouds in #Messier78, this image of the region surrounding the reflection nebula Messier 78, just north of Orion's Belt, shows clouds of cosmic dust threaded through the nebula like a string of pearls. (Through ESO)

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the region surrounding the reflection nebula Messier 78, just to the north of Orion’s belt

I really like this one: This image of the region surrounding the reflection nebula Messier 78, just to the north of Orion’s belt, shows clouds of cosmic dust threaded through the nebula like a string of pearls. The submillimetre-wavelength observations, made with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope and shown here in orange, use the heat glow of interstellar dust grains to show astronomers where new stars are being formed. They are overlaid on a view of the region in visible light.

This image of the region surrounding the reflection nebula Messier 78, just to the north of Orion’s belt, shows clouds of cosmic dust threaded through the nebula like a string of pearls. The submillimetre-wavelength observations, made with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope and shown here in orange, use the heat glow of interstellar dust grains to show astronomers where new stars are being formed. They are overlaid on a view of the region in visible light.

Orion Nebula. You can actually see this nebula, just look underneath Orion's Belt to what looks a little bit like a sword :)

Rho Ophiuchi and Antares with FSQ-106ED and Reducer QE 0.73x April 2011 Saturation Elevated Light Version By hirocun

Region surrounding the reflection nebula Messier 78, just to the north of Orion’s belt, taken from the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope.

Thackary's Globules. Located in rich star fields & hydrogen gas, these opaque clouds of interstellar dust & gas are so large they might be able to form stars. They are located in IC 2944, a bright stellar nursery about 5900 ly away toward the constellation Centaurus. The largest of these dark globules, first spotted by S African astronomer A. D. Thackeray in 1950, is likely two separate but overlapping clouds.

Highlights of Messier 78: a reflection nebula in Orion

A new image from the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope in Chile shows a beautiful view of clouds of cosmic dust in the region of Orion. The image shows the region around the reflection nebula NGC 1999 in visible light, with the APEX observations overlaid in brilliant orange tones that seem to set the dark clouds on fire. - Credit: ESO/APEX (MPIfR/ESO/OSO)/T. Stanke et al./Digitized Sky Survey 2

The universe is of the nature of a thought or sensation in a universal Mind ~ Arthur Stanley Eddington ~