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    Dr Campbell's SAFE Arsenic Complexion Wafers. Many who took the cosmetic cure were under the false impression that if a little was good, a lot was better, leading to reported cases of young women going blind or dying by overdosing on the wafers. Arsenic was at it’s height of popularity from the late 1880s to early 1900s, although, advertisements could still be found as late as the 1920s, and in the US, arsenic was only finally banned from cosmetic use in 1938.

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    9 comments

    • Whitney Gallien

      Dr. Campbell's Safe Arsenic Complexion Wafers, for LADIES // nothing says "safe" like "arsenic wafers!" // Victorian medicine ad

    • Sylvia Oudhuis

      1896 Vintage Ad Campbell Arsenic Wafers Soap. I wonder what routine treatments we do today, that will be considered outrageous & barbaric in 100 yrs?

    • Kristina Berzina

      Dr Campbell's SAFE Arsenic Complexion Wafers. Many who took the cosmetic cure were under the false impression that if a little was good, a lot was better, leading to reported cases of young women going blind or dying by overdosing on the wafers. Arsenic was at it’s height of popularity from the late 1880s to early 1900s.

    • Teri Modisette Unthank (Indy Ink)

      For the record, if you don't feel pretty, you can't wash away your beautiful freckles with poison. // 1896 Vintage Ad Campbell Arsenic Wafers Soap

    • Christine Kay

      1896 Vintage Ad Campbell Arsenic Wafers Soap --- yeah I think Arsenic would take your freckles off!

    • Debi Savicky

      1896 Vintage Ad Campbell Arsenic Wafers Soap, safe....really!

    • Lori Wright

      1896 Vintage Apothecary Ad Campbell Arsenic Wafers Soap

    • sweetrillium

      Victorian arsenic complexion wafers for the skin!

    • William Raley

      Campbell Arsenic Wafers Soap Ad (1896).

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