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Dr Campbell's SAFE Arsenic Complexion Wafers. Many who took the cosmetic cure were under the false impression that if a little was good, a lot was better, leading to reported cases of young women going blind or dying by overdosing on the wafers. Arsenic was at it’s height of popularity from the late 1880s to early 1900s, although, advertisements could still be found as late as the 1920s, and in the US, arsenic was only finally banned from cosmetic use in 1938.

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Community Post: 30 Famous Historical Figures When They Were Young

Marie Skłodowska-Curie (11/07/1867 - 7/04/1934), often referred to as Marie Curie or Madame Curie, was a Polish physicist and chemist, working mainly in France, who is famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the only woman to win in two fields, and the only person to win in multiple sciences. She was also the first female professor at the University of Paris (La Sorbonne).

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Check out Wonder Woman's brand new costume, it's got pants

Elizabeth Blackwell said she turned to medicine after a close friend who was dying suggested she would have been spared her worst suffering if her physician had been a woman. She became the first woman to receive a medical degree in the United States, as well as the first woman on the UK Medical Register

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12 Historical Women Who Gave No Fucks

Annie Smith Peck (1850–1935) scaled all the major mountains of Europe, then went to South America, where in 1908 she was the first person to scale Peru’s highest peak, Mt Huscaran, gaining international acclaim. She was also an influential scholar, writing books and lecturing around the world. She kept climbing until the age of 82. Oh, and she didn’t wear the long skirts expected of women at the time.