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  • Dee N

    Arsenic in facial soap?

  • Teri Modisette (Indy Ink)

    For the record, if you don't feel pretty, you can't wash away your beautiful freckles with poison. // 1896 Vintage Ad Campbell Arsenic Wafers Soap

  • Andrea Esh

    Arsenic Complexion Soap

  • Cyndi

    Makeup | 11 Everyday Things That Once Could Have Killed You

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