Kiowa Chief, Tomeatho [Trailing the Enemy, Eonah-pah] and Squaw, [Probably the Oldest Daughter of Satanta]; William Stinson Soule (American, 1836 - 1908); 1869 - 1874; Albumen silver print; 14.8 x 10.2 cm (5 13/16 x 4 in.); 84.XM.192.15

Kiowa Chief, Tomeatho [Trailing the Enemy, Eonah-pah] and Squaw, [Probably the Oldest Daughter of Satanta]; William Stinson Soule (American, 1836 - 1908); 1869 - 1874; Albumen silver print; 14.8 x 10.2 cm (5 13/16 x 4 in.); 84.XM.192.15

Kiowa Boys, photographed at Fort Sill, Indian Territory, 1890 by H. P. Robinson. Part of the Lawrence T. Jones III Texas photography collection. Series 4: Texas Locations and People.

Kiowa Boys, photographed at Fort Sill, Indian Territory, 1890 by H. P. Robinson. Part of the Lawrence T. Jones III Texas photography collection. Series 4: Texas Locations and People.

Chief Trotting Wolf and Wife. Var: Gu-ee-ah-pay; Coyote Walking. (Nye: 370-371; Belous/Weinstein: 46.)

Chief Trotting Wolf and Wife. Var: Gu-ee-ah-pay; Coyote Walking. (Nye: 370-371; Belous/Weinstein: 46.)

From the 1880s through the 1920s, the federal government established schools designed to make American Indians live like Anglo Americans. The schools worked to replace traditional Indian ways with those sanctioned by the government. Federal Indian policy during this period called for the removal of children from their families and in many cases, enrollment in government-run boarding schools. Policymakers assumed keeping Indians away from their culture and traditions would make them change.

From the 1880s through the 1920s, the federal government established schools designed to make American Indians live like Anglo Americans. The schools worked to replace traditional Indian ways with those sanctioned by the government. Federal Indian policy during this period called for the removal of children from their families and in many cases, enrollment in government-run boarding schools. Policymakers assumed keeping Indians away from their culture and traditions would make them change.

Topin Tone-oneo, daughter of Kicking Bird. The only one of the great Kiowa chief's children to survive him, she was with the first group of students sent to Carlisle Indian School in 1879.

Topin Tone-oneo, daughter of Kicking Bird. The only one of the great Kiowa chief's children to survive him, she was with the first group of students sent to Carlisle Indian School in 1879.

Kiowa Women - between 1880 and Native American (Kiowa) women; one woman is Big Trees sister. The women wear dresses, one wears a fringed shawl.

Kicking Bird - Kiowa - 1868:

Native American Earrings

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