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  • Michael K. Shaffer Civil War Historian

    'This Week in Civil War History: May 28 – June 3, 1864'

  • Kathryn Bastas

    General Winfield Scott Hancock, who had served in the Union Army, was in command at the Washington Penitentiary, where the defendants were being held. On the day of the execution, he stationed relays of cavalry all the way to the White House. If President Johnson changed his mind and granted a last-minute reprieve, the news would reach Hancock as soon as possible. No such reprieve came.

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THIS IS OF THE GENERALS IN THE NORTH AND SOUTH. 1. 11 STATES SECEDED FROM THE UNITED STATES. 2. GETTYSBURG WAS THE BLOODIEST BATTLE. 3. MORE THAN 400,000 SOLDIERS WERE CAPTURED IN THE DURATION OF THE WAR. 4. THE AVERAGE AGE OF THE SOLDIERS WAS 25.8 YEARS. (civilwar.org) Anna Leigh Hayes 3/17/14

WER Image: Civil War Generals maybe do something like this for all military family members

Civil War Generals. As in every major conflict, some of these men were poor excuses for human beings. Some of the poor excuses were superb military tacticians. Some were loved by their men, and couldn't move them across the street.

Civil War Generals - Union

Union Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock, wounded at Gettysburg. After the war he went on to fight Indians on the southern plains and eventually to be the Democratic candidate for president in 1880, losing to James Garfield.

+~+~ Antique Photograph ~+~+ Photograph of Bucktail Robert Valentine who fought valiantly during the Civil War and survived. June 1864