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old germanic art - Google zoeken

old germanic art - Google zoeken

old germanic art - Google zoeken

old germanic art - Google zoeken

germanic tribe art - Google zoeken

germanic tribe art - Google zoeken

Brooch, first half of 5th century, Eastern Germanic, Silver with gold sheet overlay, garnets

Brooch, first half of 5th century, Eastern Germanic, Silver with gold sheet overlay, garnets

The Suebian knot (German: Suebenknoten) is a historical male hairstyle ascribed to the tribe of the Germanic Suebi. The knot is attested by Tacitus in his 1st century CE work Germania, found on art by and depictions of the Germanic peoples, and worn by bog bodies.

The Suebian knot (German: Suebenknoten) is a historical male hairstyle ascribed to the tribe of the Germanic Suebi. The knot is attested by Tacitus in his 1st century CE work Germania, found on art by and depictions of the Germanic peoples, and worn by bog bodies.

Oval Brooch, 10th century, made in Scandinavia, Viking, copper alloy, gilt.

Oval Brooch, 10th century, made in Scandinavia, Viking, copper alloy, gilt.

Brooch, 600–700, from the Vendel period in Swedish history, which precedes the Viking age (Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Brooch, 600–700, from the Vendel period in Swedish history, which precedes the Viking age (Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Viking sword (9th/10th century CE) - pattern-welded iron inlaid with silver wire - Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC

Viking sword (9th/10th century CE) - pattern-welded iron inlaid with silver wire - Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC

Stirrup ca. 975 Though the Vikings are best known as seafaring warriors, through contact with Europe they grew even more adept as cavalrymen. This stirrup, decorated with a distinctive technique of iron inlay, is of a type found in England and may have been introduced in the renewed Viking attacks at the end of the tenth century.

Stirrup ca. 975 Though the Vikings are best known as seafaring warriors, through contact with Europe they grew even more adept as cavalrymen. This stirrup, decorated with a distinctive technique of iron inlay, is of a type found in England and may have been introduced in the renewed Viking attacks at the end of the tenth century.