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Daniel Boone Home, Defiance, Missouri. While Daniel Boone is most frequently associated with the state of Kentucky, he spent the last years of his life in Missouri. He started construction on this home in 1803. It was finished in 1810. The hand-quarried stone walls are 2 ft thick and the beams and woodwork in the home are black walnut. Boone died here in 1820.

Peacefield (John Adams home in Quincy) Quincy, Massachusetts. John and Abigail Adams lived here many years, and so did many descendants. The family kept everything just as it was until it was presented to the Park Service, and the contents are preserved intact to this day. That seems to be very rare for historic houses! The outside still looks just as it did in old pictures.

Geronimo as a younger man. A deadly warrior. Elsewhere called the greatest cavalry soldier to ever live. Ten thousand united warriors and repeating rifles and the history of the USA would have had a very different outcome.

May, 1951 - Billy Graham and his wife, Ruth, are shown at their home in the mountains in Montreat, NC. (Rudolph Vetter / The Commercial Appeal)

The Viking Ship Museum houses three ships found in large burial mounds in the Oslo fjord region. The best-preserved Viking ships in existence, each contained a wealth of material, both decorative and utilitarian, dating back up to 1200 years.

Civil War Sagafrom Civil War Saga

Who Were the Buffalo Soldiers?

Buffalo Soldiers originally were members of the U.S. 10th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army, formed on September 21, 1866 at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. The nickname was given to the "Negro Cavalry" by the Native American tribes they fought; the term eventually became synonymous with all of the African-American regiments formed in 1866. "Buffalo Soldiers" were established by Congress as the first peacetime all-black regiments in the regular U.S. Army.

The Frick House, Pittsburgh, PA The only place you can yell "FRICK" and have someone say "Why yes!"

The Daniel Boone Homestead (DBH) is a historical site in Birdsboro, Pennsylvania that tells the story of Daniel Boone’s youth in Pennsylvania’s Oley Valley and illuminates the daily lives of the region’s 18th-century settlers through the eyes of the Boone, Maugridge and DeTurk families who occupied the site. Join us for hands-on activities, living-history demonstrations, historic tours and more.

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City of Philadelphia

Declaration House ~ Philadelphia. In 1776 Thomas Jefferson rented rooms at the Declaration House. This is where he wrote the Declaration of Independence.

The origins of the Wilderness Road were the traces, or trails, created by great herds of buffalo that once roamed the region. Later used by Native Americans, such as the Cherokee & Shawnee, they called the route the "Path of the Armed Ones" or "The Great Warrior's Path." In March 1775, from present-day Kingsport, Tennessee, Daniel Boone led 30 ax-men in cutting the road. Hacking across mountains & through swamps, within a month he reached the Kentucky River, 208 miles from its starting…