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the U.S. deployment of internment camps and the legislation that makes their existence possible reached new heights following the U.S. entrance into the Second World War in 1942. An executive order paved the way for the internment of at least 11,000 German Americans and about 250 Italian Americans. These numbers pale in comparison to the approximately 120,000 persons with Japanese ancestry from the U.S. West Coast.

Civilian exclusion order posted at First and Front streets, directing removal by April of persons of Japanese ancestry, from the first San Francisco section to be affected by evacuation, 1942 (LOC)

Japanese American Internment teaches students about Executive Order 9066, the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Activity compares the experiences of Japanese Americans with the Bill of rights. This can be used in class or as homework as it’s a completely stand alone assignment. This is also perfect for substitute teacher plans. And of course, a key is included.

Japanese American Internment Informational Text Analysis for WW2

Japanese American Internment teaches students about Executive Order the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Activity compares the experiences of Japanese Americans with the Bill of rights.

Medal of Honor. William Nakamura, PFC, USA (1941). Twice on July 4, 1944, Private First Class William K. Nakamura singlehandedly attacked German machine gunners in Italy so his platoon could be freed from pinned-down positions. During his second effort, Nakamura was killed. He had volunteered for the Army after his family and other Japanese Americans on the West coast were forced to move to internment camps.

Medal of Honor recipient William Nakamura, PFC, USA Twice on July Nakamura singlehandedly attacked German machine gunners in Italy so his platoon could be freed from pinned-down positions. During his second effort, Nakamura was killed.

Heroics. 442 Infantry Regiment, Nisei (Japanese Americans). Most decorated regiment in The War

Most decorated regiment in The War. Japanese-American infantrymen of the Regimental Combat The unit was composed of nisei soldiers and white officers. Their motto was “go for broke.” They fought two wars: the Germans in Europe and prejudice in America.

Anti-Japanese demonstration. How racist is this??? And yes, this is our America during the 1940s.

Anti-Japanese demonstration in the Lots of suspicion and hate was thrown at the Canadian Japanese community because Japan was the enemy in This led to deportations and the Internment of the Japanese for the duration of the war.

vintage family photos | Vintage Photos: Francis Stewart - Japanese Internment

Residents of Colorado River Relocation Center for persons of Japanese ancestry requesting repatriation to Japan, 1942 Robert.

Japanese American Boy Tagged for Internment, Salinas by Russell Lee

Japanese American Boy tagged for ‘evacuation’ to an internment camp for the duration of WWII, Salinas, California. by Russell Lee

T/4 Taniguchi visits his wife and daughter at the Minidoka Relocation Center before returning to his unit in the Pacific. Taniguchi volunteered for the Army in 1942 when he and his family were at Tule Lake before it became a segregation center. He served in the China-Burma-India theatre and served on loan to General Wingate's Chindits, a British unit fighting in the Burma Jungles often behind Japanese lines.

Taniguchi visits his wife and daughter at the Minidoka Relocation Center before returning to his unit in the Pacific. Taniguchi volunteered for the Army in 1942 when he and his family were at Tule Lake before it became a segregation center.

From Wrong To Right: A U.S. Apology For Japanese Internment. This month marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. shared his dream for a more equal America. But there's another anniversary looming: 25 years ago this week. In 1988, President Reagan signed the Civil Liberties Act to compensate more than 100,000 people of Japanese descent who were incarcerated in internment camps during World War II.

From Wrong To Right: A U.S. Apology For Japanese Internment

John Tateishi was incarcerated at Manzanar internment camp in California from age 3 until he was 2013

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